New Horizon Report K-12 2016

What’s on the five-year horizon for K-12 Educational Technology & which trends and technologies will drive educational change?

This publication charts the five-year horizon for the impact of emerging technologies in school communities across the globe.

With 15 years of research and publications, the NMC Horizon Project can be regarded as the world’s longest-running exploration of emerging technology trends and uptake in education.

55 experts (listed on page 48) produced the 52 page NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition  and is summarized in the graphic below:
new horizon report k-12_2016

 

The report’s endnotes (pages 49-52) contain 394 valuable reference citations.

DOWNLOAD REPORT

DOWNLOAD: New Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 #EdTech Future http://kevincorbett.com/newhorizon-report-k12-2016/
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DOWNLOAD LINK>> http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2016-nmc-cosn-horizon-report-k12-EN.pdf

Citation:
Adams Becker, S., Freeman, A., Giesinger Hall, C., Cummins, M., and Yuhnke, B. (2016). NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

Facebook announced details on its virtual reality future, with Mark Zuckerberg (CEO) confirming that the Oculus Rift release date will be some time in early 2016. Market analysts offered varied reactions to how Zuckerberg described the expected—gradual—growth of the VR headset.

“This is going to grow slowly, like computers and mobile phones when they first arrived,”  Zuckerberg said during the Facebook’s 3rd quarter earnings call with analysts. He drew a comparison to the fact that, after smartphones entered the market in 2003, sales at first were in the hundreds of thousands.

Some analysts took that to mean that Facebook is in fact predicting Oculus sales in that range for 2016. “We believe FB management may have quelled investor fears of an expense growth surprise in CY16 given commentary that Oculus’s virtual reality platform could take time to develop and might just sell hundreds of thousands of units in its first year,” Goldman Sachs wrote.

Credit Suisse, meanwhile, wrote that Oculus is expected to contribute about $2.1 billion in revenue for 2016. “We continue to assume that Facebook will follow a razor/razorblades model and sell the Oculus hardware at a loss to drive adoption,” the firm wrote.

Zuckerberg also discussed the way that Virtual Reality VR could be applied to areas other than entertainment, such as social behavior and communication. “That’s where Facebook has the DNA to build the best experiences,” he said. Those other areas, Zuckerberg said, are “a lot of what we’re extremely excited about for a number of years down the road.”

It should be remembered that Facebook has already been on Social Experiments to manipulate users emotions (See: Facebook Tinkers With Users’ Emotions in News Feed Experiment, Stirring Outcry)

See My Videos of Us Playing With Oculus Rift in 2013:

Also: Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift VR

Original Article- Source: http://chicagoinno.streetwise.co/2015/11/05/oculus-rift-release-date-facebook-virtual-reality-2016-plans/

VR = Virtual Reality
IoT = Internet of Things

From medicine to science and engineering, VR and related technologies could soon change teaching and learning.

Virtual Reality and the IoT Can Fuel a Connected, Gesture-Driven Classroom
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I think Mr. Walter’s November 2nd article in EdTech HigherEd,  is forward thinking in his recent observation about the the increased use of Virtual Reality in Higher Education and it’s connection to the Internet of Things— a natural progression for research universities in all subject domains (and most definitely not going to be found in an under-classman’s large lecture hall).

One aspect of the article I don’t believe can be emphasized enough is Google’s involvement. He writes:

“Google is accelerating the march forward toward a more gesture-fueled Internet of Things. The company unveiled projects this year that incorporate not only virtual reality, but also a technology called augmented reality: a view of the real-world environment that is supplemented by computer-generated sounds, video and graphics.

Google’s major movement into the space, Project Tango, allows tablets, robots and other devices to use spatial and dimensional understanding of their environments. For example, one could use a tablet to scan a room and create a 3D map of the space, which could then be used by an architect or designer for space planning.”

From medicine to science and engineering, VR and related technologies could soon change teaching and learning.
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See a Previous Post on the Internet of Things (iot)

Original Source article: http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2015/11/virtual-reality-iot-connected-gesture-classroom
by Derek Walter

 

What is Augmented Reality

Augmented reality is the blending of virtual reality and real life, as developers can create images within applications that blend in with contents in the real world. With AR, users are able to interact with virtual contents in the real world, and are able to distinguish between the two.

An example is Microsoft’s Hololens

What is Virtual Reality

Virtual reality is all about the creation of a virtual world that users can interact with. This virtual world should be designed in such a way that users would find it difficult to tell the difference from what is real and what is not. Furthermore, Virtual Reality (VR) is usually achieved by the wearing of a VR helmet or goggles similar to the Oculus Rift.

Difference and similarities

Both virtual reality and augmented reality are similar in the goal of immersing the user, though both systems to this in different ways. With AR, users continue to be in touch with the real world while interacting with virtual objects around them. With VR, the user is isolated from the real world while immersed in a world that is completely fabricated. As it stands, VR might work better for video games and social networking in a virtual environment, such as Second Life, or even PlayStation Home.

Source:
TechTimes.com – Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality: What are the differences and similarities?
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/5078/20140406/augmented-reality-vs-virtual-reality-what-are-the-differences-and-similarities.htm

Spoiler Alert:  Virtual Reality Could Be The Next Big Thing After Mobile

“When you put on the goggles, it’s different from anything I have ever experienced in my life!” Zuckerberg described his first time using the VR headset as revelatory

Facebook’s founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg reportedly instigated the deal. “Strategically we want to start building the next major computing platform that will come after mobile.”

Zuckerberg sees the acquisition as part of Facebook’s mission to build the so-called knowledge economy. “There are not many things that are candidates to be the next major computing platform,” he said. “[This acquisition is a] long-term bet on the future of computing.”

Facebook moved quickly to acquire the Pacific Northwest Company: Oculus VR—creator of the forthcoming Oculus Rift virtual reality headset—for approximately $2 billion.

Facebook views the technology as more than a peripheral for video games. “Immersive virtual and augmented reality will become a part of people’s everyday life,” Zuckerberg said. “History suggests there will be more platforms to come, and whoever builds and defines these,” he said, will shape the future and reap the benefits.

Read the entire story in Technology Review: What Zuckerberg Sees In Oculus Rift

See My Videos of Us Playing With Oculus Rift in 2013:

Oculus Rift (VR) Roller Coaster

(From 2013 beta test) A quick video that gives a pretty good view of the Roller Coaster “virtual world” from the Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) system.

Really quite a stomach-churning immersive experience!

Related Post: Watch us having fun discovering the experience of Virtual Reality (way back in 2013) in this un-edited video: Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR)