Gamification in Education

Below is a great infographic on Gamification in Education. It is from Knewton Learning. The Gamification in Education infographic emphasizes the amount of time spent by people playing games in other areas of life and begs the question of whether the intrinsic values of gamification can also be incorporated into education, to increase the engagement, graduation, and important skills needed by students in the future.

As I’ve written in previous posts, it’s first important to distinguish Game-based Learning from Gamification, while recognizing there are measurable cognitive, social, emotional, and learning increases, with successful implementation.

See also: Gamification in Education: What? How? Why Bother?

Gamification in Education

Some signification data points from the Infographic include:

Continue Reading…

 

What is Augmented Reality

Augmented reality is the blending of virtual reality and real life, as developers can create images within applications that blend in with contents in the real world. With AR, users are able to interact with virtual contents in the real world, and are able to distinguish between the two.

An example is Microsoft’s Hololens

What is Virtual Reality

Virtual reality is all about the creation of a virtual world that users can interact with. This virtual world should be designed in such a way that users would find it difficult to tell the difference from what is real and what is not. Furthermore, Virtual Reality (VR) is usually achieved by the wearing of a VR helmet or goggles similar to the Oculus Rift.

Difference and similarities

Both virtual reality and augmented reality are similar in the goal of immersing the user, though both systems to this in different ways. With AR, users continue to be in touch with the real world while interacting with virtual objects around them. With VR, the user is isolated from the real world while immersed in a world that is completely fabricated. As it stands, VR might work better for video games and social networking in a virtual environment, such as Second Life, or even PlayStation Home.

Source:
TechTimes.com – Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality: What are the differences and similarities?
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/5078/20140406/augmented-reality-vs-virtual-reality-what-are-the-differences-and-similarities.htm

WOW!! Sweden’s Ashkan Fardost talks about internet of things, what we can expect in the future and how far the development has come.

Ashkan is an active speaker, writer, workshop leader and consultant, who is also a scientist in the research labs of Uppsala University, within the fields of organic and medicinal chemistry.

The core theme of his talk at TEDx Östersund is how the internet of things can improve societies and economies of all shapes and sizes, on a magnitude beyond our current imagination– super impressive presentation!

Do you agree with his projections? Watch & Find out!

The New Internet is NOT About Connecting People, It’s About Connecting THINGS

And…these THINGS start SHARING EXPERIENCES with other THINGS

Fascinating TEDx presentation by Benson Houghland!

Benson Hougland has a passion for technology of all kinds that drives a deep desire to make his work and the world around him better. His interests include making wine, making music, and making memories with family and friends in activities like boating, camping, and traveling.

Benson is a 17-year Temecula resident, husband, and father of two elementary school boys and an adult daughter. As vice president at Opto 22, a local software developer and hardware manufacturer of products used in the industrial automation and information technology markets, he’s responsible for product evolution, marketing, training, and communications.

social-media-changes-your-brain
Think twice about how socialmedia re-wires your brain and the impact it has on how you operate.

 

Credit: A fantastic video written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).

Further Reading–

To Facebook, We Are All LAB RATS

facebook-treats-people-like-LAB_RATSFacebook routinely adjusts its users’ news feeds — testing out the number of ads they see or the size of photos that appear — often without their knowledge. It is all for the purpose, the company says, of creating a more alluring and useful product.

But last week, Facebook revealed that it had manipulated the news feeds of over half a million randomly selected users to change the number of positive and negative posts they saw. It was part of a psychological study to examine how emotions can be spread on social media.

The company says users consent to this kind of manipulation when they agree to its Facebook Terms of Service (click the link to see how much you give away!). But in the quick judgment of the Internet, that argument was not universally accepted.

“I wonder if Facebook KILLED anyone with their emotion manipulation stunt. At their scale and with depressed people out there, it’s possible,” the privacy activist Lauren Weinstein wrote in a Twitter post.
On Sunday afternoon, the Facebook researcher who led the study, Adam D. I. Kramer (Data Scientist), posted a public apology on his Facebook page.

“I can understand why some people have concerns about it, and my co-authors and I are very sorry for the way the paper described the research and any anxiety it caused,” he wrote.

Facebook is hardly the only Internet company that manipulates and analyzes consumer data. Google and Yahoo also watch how users interact with search results or news articles to adjust what is shown; they say this improves the user experience. But Facebook’s most recent test did not appear to have such a beneficial purpose.

“Facebook didn’t do anything illegal, but they didn’t do right by their customers,” said Brian Blau, a technology analyst with Gartner, a research firm. “Doing psychological testing on people crosses the line.”

In an academic paper published in conjunction with two university researchers, the company reported that, for one week in January 2012, it had altered the number of positive and negative posts in the news feeds of 689,003 randomly selected users to see what effect the changes had on the tone of the posts the recipients then wrote.

The researchers found that moods were contagious. The people who saw more positive posts responded by writing more positive posts. Similarly, seeing more negative content prompted the viewers to be more negative in their own posts.

Although academic protocols generally call for getting people’s consent before psychological research is conducted on them, Facebook didn’t ask for explicit permission from those it selected for the experiment. It argued that its 1.28 billion monthly users gave blanket consent to the company’s research as a condition of using the service.

But the social network’s manipulation of its users’ feelings without their knowledge stirred up its own negative reaction. Some Facebook users and critics suggested that the company had crossed an ethical boundary.

Original Article Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/technology/facebook-tinkers-with-users-emotions-in-news-feed-experiment-stirring-outcry.html

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