HAL 9000 Artificial Intelligence (from movie 2001)

“Robotics and AI have become one of the most prominent technological trends of our century.
The fast increase of their use and development brings new and difficult challenges to our society”, writes Delvaux. Therefore, the reasoning goes, “robots and artificial intelligence (AI) would increase their interaction with humans”, raising “legal and ethical issues which require a prompt intervention at EU level”.

I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That*

Science fiction meets science fact and thee three laws of robots just appeared in a draft European Parliament committee report on robots and artificial intelligence titled: Workshop on Robotics & Artificial Intelligence.

While it is a non-binding document, these rules could be adopted by the EU this month.

Read the full article: http://delano.lu/d/detail/news/im-afraid-i-cant-do/132457

IF you’re not familiar with where the title of the article comes from, you MUST watch the historical scene (2:11 min)  from the ground-breaking 1968 movie 2001.
The movie is partially based on Arthur C. Clarke’s short story The Sentinal, first published in a fantasy magazine (1951).

In the clip, astronaut Dave argues with HAL9000 AI:

3 Laws For Robots

The Three Laws of Robotics (often shortened to The Three Laws or known as Asimov’s Laws) are a set of rules devised by the science fiction author Isaac Asimov involving artificial intelligence and explained by him in the archived video below.

The rules were first introduced in his 1942 short story “Runaround“, although they had been foreshadowed in a few earlier stories. The Three Laws, quoted as being from the “Handbook of Robotics, 56th Edition, 2058 A.D.”, are:

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.

The Future of Employment Research Report from Oxford University

In this report, Oxford University addresses the question: How susceptible are jobs to computerization?

Doing so, they build on the existing literature in two ways. First, drawing upon recent advances in Machine Learning (ML) and Mobile Robotics (MR), they develop a novel methodology to categorize occupations according to their susceptibility to computerization.

702 Occupations Examined

Second, they implement this methodology to estimate the probability of computerization for 702 detailed occupations, and examine expected impacts of future computerization on US labor market outcomes.

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