Marc Prensky (www.marcprensky.com) is the CEO of Games2train and the author of "Dont Bother Me Mom– Im Learning!: How Computer and Video Games Are Preparing Your Kids For Twenty-first Century Success — and How You Can Help!" He feels that the reality of mobile learning in the classroom is going to come more quickly that we may think and that it will require a new partnership between teachers and students.

Bond University documented a significant improvement in student success after implementing Blackboard Mobile Learn. Dr. Shelley Kinash, Director Office of Quality Teaching and Learning, presents the research findings that earned Bond University the 2012 Blackboard Mobile Catalyst Award!

Learning Technologies- The web within us:  When minds and machines become one

video by Ray Kurzweil (excerpts below)

The onset of the 21st century is an era in which the very nature of what it means to be human is both enriched and challenged, as our species breaks the shackles of its genetic legacy, and achieves inconceivable heights of intelligence, material progress, and longevity. The paradigm shift rate is now doubling every decade, so the twenty-first century will see 20,000 years of progress at todays rate. Consider how much the world has changed recently. Just a few years ago, people did not use social networks (Facebook, for example, was founded in 2004 and now has over 800 million active users), wikis, blogs, or tweets. Most people did not use search engines or mobile phones in the 1990s. Imagine the world without these. That sounds like ancient history, but it was not so long ago. The world will change even more in the near future. By 2020, we will have the means to programme our biology away from disease and aging. Information technology will be the majority of the economy in the 2020s and by the end of that decade virtual environments will be indistinguishable from reality. Virtually all technology will be nanotechnology within two decades, solving the energy problem and providing every kind of material resource that we need from mere information and inexpensive raw materials.