How are new digital technologies changing how teachers teach and students learn?

Network & Internet Security company Enterasys published the following Infographic based on a recent survey.

How do the results compare against YOUR institution?

Digital Technology in Education: Adoption Rates of New Styles of K-12 Teaching

Here’s a quick list of their findings:

  • 21% Currently Use Digital TEXT BOOKS; 37% plan to move to DIGITAL ONLY in the near future.
  • 40%+ Network Infrastructure INADEQUATE for Digital VIDEO content
  • 84% CAN monitor Student Network Use (CIPA FCC 11-125)
  • 27% canNOT customize student network by grade level (or with difficulty)
  • 46% of schools that plat to exclusively use Online ASSESSMENT for testing.
  • 43% Currently Use OR PLAN to try FLIPPED CLASSROOMS
  • *33% are currently using SOCIAL MEDIA.

PARTICIPATE in my survey

*IF you’re using Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, or Twitter, will you please participate in my online survey?

I’m looking for REAL examples of teaching and learning with Social Media.

GO TO–> Google Survey form. Please share this survey with others and I’ll share back the results! 

 

Adoption Rates of New Styles of K-12 Teaching

Source: http://blogs.enterasys.com/adoption-rates-of-new-styles-of-k-12-teaching-infographic/

(press "CC" under the timeline for subtitles) The first episode in the series is an introduction to Online Learning and why we use it in the Nordic Armed Forces.

Marc Prensky (www.marcprensky.com) is the CEO of Games2train and the author of "Dont Bother Me Mom– Im Learning!: How Computer and Video Games Are Preparing Your Kids For Twenty-first Century Success — and How You Can Help!" He feels that the reality of mobile learning in the classroom is going to come more quickly that we may think and that it will require a new partnership between teachers and students.

A decade ago, MIT broke ground with its OpenCourseWare initiative, which made MIT course materials, such as syllabi and lecture notes, publicly accessible. But over the last five years, MIT Provost L. Rafael Reif has led an effort to move the complete MIT classroom experience online, with video lectures, homework assignments, lab work — and a grade at the end. That project, called MITx, launched late last year. On March 16, Reif announced that MIT Professor Anant Agarwal would step down as director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) in order to lead MITs Open Learning Enterprise, which will oversee MITxs development. Learn more about Agarwal and MITx at: web.mit.edu From MIT News – MIT launches online learning initiative: web.mit.edu What is MITx?: web.mit.edu