Online learning allows for individualized and personalized instruction. There are many ways to facilitate communication in an online course and how eLearning instructors choose to use them can mean all the difference for the students. When connections are made between teacher and student and student-to-student, a powerful synergy can be created to improve learning, deepen understanding and create a positive learning environment.

The infographic below presents one perspective on the importance of communication and methods within a eLearning course to achieve optimum results.

online-contact-infographic620x1508

Infographics are by mmacmeekins@yahoo.com from http://anethicalisland.wordpress.com/
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Choosing the Right HigherEd Degree Infographic

 Source: http://www.gradschoolhub.com/choosing/

Choosing the Right Degree

What matters most when choosing a graduate degree? Money? Doing something you love? The journey to finding the right master’s degree can be a long one.

What Do You Want?

– Consider these options when choosing a graduate school:

  • Location
  • Quality of life
  • Degree programs offered
  • Cost
  • Time
  • Resources
  • Faculty
  • On-campus or online
  • Ranking
  • Accreditation

“Love what you do and do what you love.” – Ray Bradbury, author

What Do You Like?

– Think about the things in your life that excite you. There may well be a master’s degree option that allows you to truly do what you love.

The Realistic Path

– If you like to…

  • Do things with your hands
  • Be outside
  • Work with real-world materials
  • Work solo

– Consider these fields: farmer/rancher, surveyor, forester, mechanical drafter, technician, firefighter, correctional officer, animal control worker, chef, landscaping, carpenter, explosive worker, machine operator, repairer, machinist, agricultural inspector, animal breeder, jeweler, precious-metals worker, pilot
– Possible degree
– Oregon State University
– Master of Forestry
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $13,188
– Non-resident: $21,219

The Investigative Path

– If you like to…

  • Do an extensive amount of thinking
  • Mentally search for facts and figures

– Consider these fields: coroner, computer and information scientist, engineer, animal scientist, biologist, physicist, chemist, economist, anthropologist, archeologist, geographer, historian, political scientist, astronomer, sociologist, dentist, nutritionist, veterinarian, detective
– Possible degree
– University of Colorado-Denver
– Master of Science in Chemistry
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $5,087
– Non-resident: $15,619

The Artistic Path

– If you like to…

  • Work with form, design and pattern
  • Express yourself
  • Not follow a clear set of rules

– Consider these fields: architect, art director, fine artist, animator, fashion designer, actor, dancer, musician, graphic designer, interior designer, creative writer, film editor, makeup artist, choreographer
– Possible degree
– Parsons The New School for Design, New York City
– Master of Fashion Studies
– Average graduate tuition
– $20,855

The Social Path

– If you like to…

  • Work with, communicate and teach people
  • Help others

– Consider these fields: social worker, probation officer, counselor, health educator, clergy, teacher, nurse, physical therapist, athletic trainer, speech-language pathologist, child care worker
– Possible degree
– Loyola University (Illinois)
– Master of Social Work
– Average graduate tuition
– $13,950

The Enterprising Path

– If you like to…

  • Start and carry out projects
  • Make many decisions
  • Take risks
  • Deal with business

– Consider these fields: chief executive, general manager, legislator, manager, education administrator, funeral director, logisticians, producer, program director, copy writer, head cook, special agent, PR specialist, insurance agent, product promoter, ship captain
– Possible degree
– Central Michigan University
– Master of Science in Administration
– Average graduate tuition
– $7,305

The Conventional Path

– If you like to…

  • Follow set procedures and routines
  • Work with data and details
  • Follow authority

– Consider these fields: treasurer, controller, insurance adjuster, accountant, auditor, financial analyst, loan officer, tax preparer, database administrator, librarian, medical transcriptionist, proofreader, inspector
– Possible degree
– William & Mary, Williamsburg, Va.
– Master of Accounting
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $29,610
– Non-resident: $40,010

Know Your Financial Aid Options

– To be sure, financing a graduate degree can be an expensive proposition. But consider the various types of financial aid available.

  • Scholarships
  • Grants
  • Veteran’s education benefits
  • Loans
  • Employer-based aid
  • Teaching and research assistantships

It’s About Getting a Job, Right?

Top graduate degrees for pay and career growth through 2020:

Mid-career pay Projected growth by 2020

– 1. Physician assistant studies $97,000 30%
– 2. Computer science $109,000 22.3%
– 3. Electrical engineering $121,000 17.7%
– 4. Mathematics (tie) $91,000 24.7%
– 4. Information systems (tie) $95,500 23.3%
– 6. Physics $114,000 20.3%
– 7. Occupational therapy $79,200 33%
– 8. Healthcare administration $87,800 22%
– 9. Nursing $85,900 21.7%
– 10. Economics $115,000 14.3%

Time an Issue? Consider Online

Top online graduate schools:

  • Washington State University 
    Cost: $509 per credit
    Top programs: Business and engineering
  • Duke University – Fuqua School of Business 
    Cost: $6,381per year
    Top programs: MBA, executive MBA
  • St. John’s University 
    Cost: $35,520 per year
    Top programs: Law, education
  • Carnegie Mellon University 
    Cost: $453-$540 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, business, computer science
  • Stanford University
    Cost: $890 per credit hour
    Top programs: Law, engineering, medicine
  • Columbia University
    Cost: $628 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, computer information technology
  • Penn State University
    Cost: $8,222 per year, in-state
    Top programs: Clinical psychology, engineering, education
  • Arizona State University
    Cost: $463 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, education
  • Central Michigan University
    Cost: $477 per credit hour
    Top programs: Business, education
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Cost: $1,100 per credit hour
    Top programs: Production/operations, supply chain/logistics, chemical engineering, civil engineering, physics

SOURCES
– http://www.campusexplorer.com
– http://mappingyourfuture.org
– http://oregonstate.edu
– http://www.ucdenver.edu
– http://www.newschool.edu
– http://www.luc.edu
– http://global.cmich.edu
– http://mason.wm.edu
– http://www.emory.edu
– http://www.forbes.com

Growing Mobile Workforce

mobile workforce

It is estimated that 75% of the workforce in the US is already mobile and  that by 2015 the mobile workfoce, worldwide, will reach 1.3 billion or a staggering 37.2% of the global mobile workforce.

Are YOU part of the mobile workforce? Are you using mobile devices for your work? IF not, why not? Would the use of a mobile device in your field be a boon or a bust?

(Source: IDC predicts)

From the Sloan Consortium comes the tenth annual survey titled: Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States.

The higher education eLearning survey is a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, and purports itself to be the leading barometer of online learning in the United States.

 

“The rate of growth in online enrollments remains extremely robust,” said study co-author Jeff Seaman, Co-Director of the Babson Survey Research Group. “This is somewhat surprising given that overall higher education enrollments actually declined during this period.”

 

Ten Key eLearning Report Findings include:

changing-course-infographic
  • Over 6.7 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2011 term, an increase of 570,000 students over the previous year.
  • Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • 77% of academic leaders surveyed reported online learning outcomes to be the same, somewhat superior or superior to face-to-face in 2012.
  • 45% of CAOs agree that it takes more faculty time and effort to
    teach an online course than a face-to-face course.
  • Only 2.6% higher education institutions currently have a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), another 9.4 percent report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • Academic LEADERS remain unconvinced that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses, but do believe that they provide an important means for institutions to learn about online pedagogy.
  • Seventy-seven percent of academic leaders rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face.
  • Only 30.2 percent of chief academic OFFICERS believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education – a rate is lower than recorded in 2004.
  • The proportion of chief academic LEADERS that say that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy is at a new high of 69.1 percent.
  • A majority of chief academic officers at all types of institutions continue to believe that lower retention rates for online courses are a barrier to the wide-spread adoption of online education.

DOWNLOAD the Full eLearning Report

 

Source:
http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/changing_course_2012

Blended Learning is helping to evolve teaching as it provides increased benefits for both teachers and students.

The infographic below highlights the benefits of blended learning and how blended learning can improve conditions and provide for increased career opportunities within education.

blended-learning-guide

OPEN Courseware (OCW)

What is Open Courseware?

Open courseware (OCW) programs are developed by universities. These universities have a department especially for develop OCW content. The content is just recordings, assignments, and readings from professors teaching a class on campus. In essence, Open Courseware (OCW) is repurposed content from traditional course.

How Does It Work?

These resources are collected and uploaded to a website accessible to everyone from around the world. OCW courses don’t involve real time professor to student communication, any deadlines or required assignments, and there’s no credit granted at the end of the course (or degree for that matter) but the classes also don’t cost anything and people can start and stop them whenever they wish. The bottom line is: OCW is all about self-learners, people who just have the thirst for knowledge. And the best part is – the top colleges in the country and world are getting on board with this, which means OCW offers fairly expensive content completely for free.

How Is It Useful?

While it might seem like kicking off an OCW site would be cheap for universities – the content is already in existence, after all – but Yale predicts it costs them about $30,000-$40,000/ year to keep their OCW running. These costs include the video equipment, the employees managing the site, and more. This isn’t a particularly huge dent at a college like Yale, but it is a completely free service and therefore Yale has no way of recouping its costs. The mission of OCWs, however, is to distribute free content. Fortunately there are many non-profits who see the value in this kind of accessible education and are donating grants and funds to the cause.

Open Courseware Organizations

The following Infographic from OnlineCollegeCourses.net presents the important points around open courseware:
opencourseware

 

Source:

How Online Course Will Change the World OnlineCollegeCourses.net is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at w‎.