Flipping the classroom might not be easy, but it puts higher ed students at the center of learning to promote better results.

Results of a survey of 1,089 Faculty Focus readers, between June 15, 2014, and July 20, 2014.

What’s a Flipped Classroom?

flipped-class-higher-edOne of the most interesting themes that emerged from this survey is the amount of confusion about what “flipped” means. Much of the contention about whether a flipped classroom leads to enhanced learning seems to point toward the different ways educators define or conceptualize it.

When asked to define/describe the flipped classroom in their own words, respondents varied in their description.
Some relied on the definitions related to leveraging technology (i.e., videos of lectures), while others described it in terms of active, student-centered, collaborative learning strategies.

The terminology and definitions are causing confusion, but most scholars and survey respondents seem to agree that active learning and student-centered learning approaches are the foundational principles of the flipped philosophy, and the value of this approach is that it can lead to enhanced student engagement, motivation, and learning, if done well.

Highlights from the 16-page report include:

  • More than two-thirds (69.5%) have tried flipping an activity, class, period, or course, and plan to do it again.
    Another 5.49% have tried flipping, but don’t plan to do it again.
  • Roughly one-third (31.8%) of those who have flipped did so within the past year.
  • The majority of faculty who have flipped rated the experience as positive for themselves (70.3%) and their students (64.8%).
  • The Tweet this! Top Reasons for Flipping include a desire to increase Student ENGAGEMENT (79.3%) and improve LEARNING (75.8%).
  • In terms of the actual benefits, nearly three-fourths did see greater student engagement (74.9%), while just over half saw evidence of improved student learning (54.66%).
  • More than 80% said students are more collaborative and 76.61% said they ask more questions, while almost half (48.75%) also noted some student resistance.
  • The most frequently reported barrier for faculty who want to try flipping is limited time. Nearly 70% said it was a very significant challenge (38.1%) or a significant challenge (31.61%).
  • Of those respondents who are not interested in flipped learning, 38.9% said they don’t know enough about it and 27.4% felt it was a fad.

#FlipClass puts #HigherEd students at the center of learning to promote better results.
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Survey respondents sound off on pros and cons of flipping

“The lines have become blurred and people talk about flipped classroom in ways it was never originally designed. The technology-enhanced, non-rigorous flipped classroom should not be confused with research-based active learning pedagogies.”
– Associate professor at a four-year public institution

“It’s very dependent on how well students can be motivated to do the work outside class. When they’re not willing, it’s worse than traditional methods.”
– Instructor at a public, four-year Canadian research-intensive university

“Students in my face-to-face classes thrive on an active learning environment in which they are engaged in a variety of activities.”
– Adjunct professor at a two-year institution

“There is more work involved. It takes more preparation and more emotional energy to be this involved with students.”
– Instructor from a public, four-year institution

  

See More: Blended Learning Videos

 

The Mobile Learning in Higher Education [INFOGRAPHIC]

72% of best selling apps in 2012 were aimed at PREschoolers and children in elementary school
52% of children now have access to a smartphone or tablet
On average, each millenial owns 2.4 devices
Kids 11-14 spend on average 73 minutes a day texting
94% of students text every day
57% of college students use a smartphone (2013 data seems low to me)
75% of students have their phones near them 24 hours a day
58% can’t go more than an hour without checking their phone

With mobile devices being used at younger and younger ages, what are the implications for Higher Education?


Mobile Learning in Higher Education Infographic

More on Mobile Learning

The tuition at our nation’s colleges are rising faster than inflation, medical costs, and importantly: the income of 99% of Americans. Four years at a private university now costs as much as a new Ferrari sports car, and a student from a public university can expect to graduate with $25,000 or more in student debt. But, did you ever wonder where all that money is going?

Higher Education Tuition Breakdown

tuition-cost-of-higher-education

Original Source: http://radioopensource.org/college-budgets/

Game-Based Learning in Higher Education (2012)
On March 9, 2012 the USC Center for Excellence in Teaching in conjunction with the Center for Scholarly Technology presented a faculty forum on Game-based Learning in Higher-Education. An exceptional presentation was given by Provost Professor and world-renowned game scholar Henry Jenkins, Director of the Institute for Multimedia Literacy, Holly Willis, and Cinematic Arts Undergraduate student Allison Tate-Cortese that spawned a thoughtful and engaging discussion. In this overview, event moderator Geoff Middlebrook explains the context of the event and provides information to inspire your thinking about game-based learning.

Choosing the Right HigherEd Degree Infographic

 Source: http://www.gradschoolhub.com/choosing/

Choosing the Right Degree

What matters most when choosing a graduate degree? Money? Doing something you love? The journey to finding the right master’s degree can be a long one.

What Do You Want?

– Consider these options when choosing a graduate school:

  • Location
  • Quality of life
  • Degree programs offered
  • Cost
  • Time
  • Resources
  • Faculty
  • On-campus or online
  • Ranking
  • Accreditation

“Love what you do and do what you love.” – Ray Bradbury, author

What Do You Like?

– Think about the things in your life that excite you. There may well be a master’s degree option that allows you to truly do what you love.

The Realistic Path

– If you like to…

  • Do things with your hands
  • Be outside
  • Work with real-world materials
  • Work solo

– Consider these fields: farmer/rancher, surveyor, forester, mechanical drafter, technician, firefighter, correctional officer, animal control worker, chef, landscaping, carpenter, explosive worker, machine operator, repairer, machinist, agricultural inspector, animal breeder, jeweler, precious-metals worker, pilot
– Possible degree
– Oregon State University
– Master of Forestry
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $13,188
– Non-resident: $21,219

The Investigative Path

– If you like to…

  • Do an extensive amount of thinking
  • Mentally search for facts and figures

– Consider these fields: coroner, computer and information scientist, engineer, animal scientist, biologist, physicist, chemist, economist, anthropologist, archeologist, geographer, historian, political scientist, astronomer, sociologist, dentist, nutritionist, veterinarian, detective
– Possible degree
– University of Colorado-Denver
– Master of Science in Chemistry
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $5,087
– Non-resident: $15,619

The Artistic Path

– If you like to…

  • Work with form, design and pattern
  • Express yourself
  • Not follow a clear set of rules

– Consider these fields: architect, art director, fine artist, animator, fashion designer, actor, dancer, musician, graphic designer, interior designer, creative writer, film editor, makeup artist, choreographer
– Possible degree
– Parsons The New School for Design, New York City
– Master of Fashion Studies
– Average graduate tuition
– $20,855

The Social Path

– If you like to…

  • Work with, communicate and teach people
  • Help others

– Consider these fields: social worker, probation officer, counselor, health educator, clergy, teacher, nurse, physical therapist, athletic trainer, speech-language pathologist, child care worker
– Possible degree
– Loyola University (Illinois)
– Master of Social Work
– Average graduate tuition
– $13,950

The Enterprising Path

– If you like to…

  • Start and carry out projects
  • Make many decisions
  • Take risks
  • Deal with business

– Consider these fields: chief executive, general manager, legislator, manager, education administrator, funeral director, logisticians, producer, program director, copy writer, head cook, special agent, PR specialist, insurance agent, product promoter, ship captain
– Possible degree
– Central Michigan University
– Master of Science in Administration
– Average graduate tuition
– $7,305

The Conventional Path

– If you like to…

  • Follow set procedures and routines
  • Work with data and details
  • Follow authority

– Consider these fields: treasurer, controller, insurance adjuster, accountant, auditor, financial analyst, loan officer, tax preparer, database administrator, librarian, medical transcriptionist, proofreader, inspector
– Possible degree
– William & Mary, Williamsburg, Va.
– Master of Accounting
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $29,610
– Non-resident: $40,010

Know Your Financial Aid Options

– To be sure, financing a graduate degree can be an expensive proposition. But consider the various types of financial aid available.

  • Scholarships
  • Grants
  • Veteran’s education benefits
  • Loans
  • Employer-based aid
  • Teaching and research assistantships

It’s About Getting a Job, Right?

Top graduate degrees for pay and career growth through 2020:

Mid-career pay Projected growth by 2020

– 1. Physician assistant studies $97,000 30%
– 2. Computer science $109,000 22.3%
– 3. Electrical engineering $121,000 17.7%
– 4. Mathematics (tie) $91,000 24.7%
– 4. Information systems (tie) $95,500 23.3%
– 6. Physics $114,000 20.3%
– 7. Occupational therapy $79,200 33%
– 8. Healthcare administration $87,800 22%
– 9. Nursing $85,900 21.7%
– 10. Economics $115,000 14.3%

Time an Issue? Consider Online

Top online graduate schools:

  • Washington State University 
    Cost: $509 per credit
    Top programs: Business and engineering
  • Duke University – Fuqua School of Business 
    Cost: $6,381per year
    Top programs: MBA, executive MBA
  • St. John’s University 
    Cost: $35,520 per year
    Top programs: Law, education
  • Carnegie Mellon University 
    Cost: $453-$540 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, business, computer science
  • Stanford University
    Cost: $890 per credit hour
    Top programs: Law, engineering, medicine
  • Columbia University
    Cost: $628 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, computer information technology
  • Penn State University
    Cost: $8,222 per year, in-state
    Top programs: Clinical psychology, engineering, education
  • Arizona State University
    Cost: $463 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, education
  • Central Michigan University
    Cost: $477 per credit hour
    Top programs: Business, education
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Cost: $1,100 per credit hour
    Top programs: Production/operations, supply chain/logistics, chemical engineering, civil engineering, physics

SOURCES
– http://www.campusexplorer.com
– http://mappingyourfuture.org
– http://oregonstate.edu
– http://www.ucdenver.edu
– http://www.newschool.edu
– http://www.luc.edu
– http://global.cmich.edu
– http://mason.wm.edu
– http://www.emory.edu
– http://www.forbes.com

From the Sloan Consortium comes the tenth annual survey titled: Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States.

The higher education eLearning survey is a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, and purports itself to be the leading barometer of online learning in the United States.

 

“The rate of growth in online enrollments remains extremely robust,” said study co-author Jeff Seaman, Co-Director of the Babson Survey Research Group. “This is somewhat surprising given that overall higher education enrollments actually declined during this period.”

 

Ten Key eLearning Report Findings include:

changing-course-infographic
  • Over 6.7 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2011 term, an increase of 570,000 students over the previous year.
  • Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • 77% of academic leaders surveyed reported online learning outcomes to be the same, somewhat superior or superior to face-to-face in 2012.
  • 45% of CAOs agree that it takes more faculty time and effort to
    teach an online course than a face-to-face course.
  • Only 2.6% higher education institutions currently have a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), another 9.4 percent report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • Academic LEADERS remain unconvinced that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses, but do believe that they provide an important means for institutions to learn about online pedagogy.
  • Seventy-seven percent of academic leaders rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face.
  • Only 30.2 percent of chief academic OFFICERS believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education – a rate is lower than recorded in 2004.
  • The proportion of chief academic LEADERS that say that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy is at a new high of 69.1 percent.
  • A majority of chief academic officers at all types of institutions continue to believe that lower retention rates for online courses are a barrier to the wide-spread adoption of online education.

DOWNLOAD the Full eLearning Report

 

Source:
http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/changing_course_2012