Gamification Basics

From Extra-Credits.net

This is a fantastic video discussing Gamification Basics comparing the engagement of real-world leisure activities that use advances in science,  to our work and educational systems which have not advanced.

The argument is that businesses are using Behavioral Modification techniques (B.F. Skinner) to increase our engagement and that we’re becoming less productive at work in school because of the difference.

They’re careful to be clear that there is a potential for “good” and “bad” when gamification is applied to any of the three areas.

Listen for these key phrases:

  • Crisis of engagement in the real-world
  • shape our consumption beneficial to them
  • be wary because somebody out there is going to try to use it against you

Got thoughts on Gamification Basics? Share them in the comments

 

 

 

Complete video available for purchase at fora.tv Video game executive Bing Gordon talks about the role of gamification in tech sectors. —- What new trends will emerge in the next several years? Find out at one of the Churchill Clubs most anticipated events of the year: the 14th Annual Top 10 Tech Trends debate. Be sure to get your seat as we welcome some of the techno-industries leading (and most opinionated) luminaries as they evaluate predictions for the years ahead. Our distinguished panel will rate and debate the trends. And our usual live audience of Silicon Valleys best and brightest—all with opinions of your own—will be asked to agree or disagree.

This video blog entry is a companion to the article of the same title on EmergingEdTech.com [URL: www.emergingedtech.com A recent research paper sheds light on several ways in which educational games can facilitate the learning experience and benefit the student. The current trend towards the increased use of games and game mechanics in instructional situations could probably have been foreseen quite some time ago. Stretching right back to the primitive gaming technology of the ZX Spectrum in the early 80′s, kids were hooked. As a wider variety and higher quality of educational games have been produced, it is really no surprise that educationists have gravitated towards further use of them as tools in the learning environment. Is this necessarily a positive development, however? A recent article on the subject makes for interesting reading. Please click through to the URL to read the full article. Thanks!