(press "CC" under the timeline for subtitles) The first episode in the series is an introduction to Online Learning and why we use it in the Nordic Armed Forces.

My Online Neighborhood

This animated video is a part of Common Sense Medias comprehensive Digital Literacy and Citizenship curriculum. It introduces key concepts for students in grades K-3 and offers 3 important rules for being safe online. Use this video in your classroom in conjunction with the lesson plans available at www.commonsensemedia.org This video is licensed under Creative Commons: creativecommons.org Please contact Common Sense Media with questions about our terms of use.

Internet Safety for Kids K-3

Internet safety for kids is a topic getting much attention because children are being exposed to the Internet at a younger and younger age. IUP Communications Media professor Erick Lauber and his student production team at IUPs Digital Media Institute recently produced this video on Internet safety for kids for the Indiana Area School District. It is currently used as part of the in-school training for students in kindergarten through third grade. For this video, Lauber received the Broadcast Education Associations Award of Excellence in the Educational and Instructional Video category. Find out more about IUPs Department of Communications Media: www.iup.edu Find out more about IUPs Digital Media Institute: www.iup.edu

This video blog entry is a companion to the article of the same title on EmergingEdTech.com [URL: www.emergingedtech.com A recent research paper sheds light on several ways in which educational games can facilitate the learning experience and benefit the student. The current trend towards the increased use of games and game mechanics in instructional situations could probably have been foreseen quite some time ago. Stretching right back to the primitive gaming technology of the ZX Spectrum in the early 80′s, kids were hooked. As a wider variety and higher quality of educational games have been produced, it is really no surprise that educationists have gravitated towards further use of them as tools in the learning environment. Is this necessarily a positive development, however? A recent article on the subject makes for interesting reading. Please click through to the URL to read the full article. Thanks!