eLearning Statistics for 2014

Predicting the Near Future for eLearning

The growth in eLearning is predicted from the past, in a great infographic from The eLearning Industry.

The power and potential for elearning is clear as the infographic focuses on higher education and business in the following areas.

Benefits of Online Learning

  • Money Spent on eLearning continues to grow–DOUBLING by 2015
  • 50% savings, on training with a 60% reduction of time.
  • Half of ALL college classes to be online by 2019.
  • eLearning is Ecologically Friendly with 90% reduction in energy over traditional classes.
  • Increase in Fortune 500 company use with over 41% now using technology for instruction.
  • Self-paced Industry growth with the most rapid growth in developing nations.
  • Productivity boost with a calculation of $30 worth of productivity for every $1 spent.
  • Companies offering online learning retain more employees and generate more revenue per employee.
  • 72% of companies surveyed stated eLearning keeps them up-to-date with industry changes and makes them more competitive.

Top 10 eLearning Statistics for 2014

 

eLearning Statistics for 2014

Source: http://www.elearningindustry.com

Blended Learning is helping to evolve teaching as it provides increased benefits for both teachers and students.

The infographic below highlights the benefits of blended learning and how blended learning can improve conditions and provide for increased career opportunities within education.

blended-learning-guide

A great article by Todd Tauber The dirty little secret of online learning: Students are bored and dropping out discusses the recent over-hyped and under-completed massive online courses.

He offers a couple reasons for their failure and concludes that future IS bright with increased funding and development!

Problems

Design

So why are all these students falling asleep, virtually, in their digital classes? Mainly because the people putting education online are still thinking in terms of classrooms. And despite incorporating “decades of research on how students learn best”, the world has changed a lot in just the last few years.

Need

 learning has to fit in between life and work. In a recent Duke University survey of MOOC students, for example, the most commonly cited barrier to completion was “lack of time/amount of time required.” Yet most of today’s online courses basically consist of reading assignments, lecture videos, homework problems and quizzes.

Promise

 The National Science Foundation, for example, is funding a study by MIT researchers to understand exactly why the vast majority of MOOC students don’t make it to the finish line. Carnegie Mellon University, meanwhile, is spending $500,000 to $1 million to create each of 15 new courses based on up-to-date research into how adults learn online. And investments in next generation adaptive learning technologies are surging.

Also mentioned is the important need to think about MOBILE LEARNING (#mLearning) and how to properly engage students.

The rush to create online courses has, in many cases simply meant “classroom online” and, it doesn’t work. New pedagogies have to be utilized to interface with the technologies in ways that engage today’s busy and active learner. The   promise of the future is there…just not yet.

A great article read the original at:  QZ.com

Distance education used to be about the distance, and now it’s really about the education.” Jean Runyon, dean of learning advancement and the Virtual Campus at Anne Arundel Community College in Maryland

Why Higher Education is Looking for E-Learning Leaders

By Tanya Roscorla (Twitter: reportertanya)

Universities and community colleges are looking to hire staff who can help institutions adapt successfully to the ever-changing technology landscape.

But because online learning is a fast-moving field, the leaders that institutions hire will need to envision which technology and economic models will work.

 

Daphne Koller: What We’re Learning From Online Education

Daphne Koller is the ‘birth mother’ of Coursera, and along with Stanford colleague Andrew Ng are the two behind the rise of MOOC’s and disruptive elearning in higher education.

This is a FANTASTIC video which provides insight into the impetus for Coursera and an inside view of this fantastic technology company.

 

 

About the Coursera Video (from a presentation at TED)

Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free — not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.

With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them. Bio: http://www.ted.com/speakers/daphne_koller.html