mobile learningResearch for UNICON, produced by Ashridge, November 2011
Research Question:  How are mobile technologies changing the executive learning landscape?

DOWNLOAD MOBILE LEARNING RESEARCH REPORT HERE (64 pg PDF)

Table of Contents

  • Definition of ‘Mobile Learning’
  • What is a Mobile Device?
  • Why Mobile Learning?
  • How Mobile Devices can be used for Learning

Case Examples

  • Introduction
  • Hub of expertise in the education sector:
    Abilene Christian University
  • Hubs of activity in the education sector:
    Embedding library resources within programmes
  • Hubs of activity in the education sector:
    Bringing the real world into the classroom
  • Hubs of activity in the private sector:
    Cementing knowledge through simulations

Moving Forwards with Mobile Learning

  • Implementation
  • Getting Buy In
  • Choosing Technology
  • Costs
  • Knowing your Mobile Learner
  • Pedagogy First
  • Content
  • Support
  • To Evaluate or Not?
  • Next Steps

The Creativity Crisis-The Decrease in Creative Thinking Scores on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) was developed in 1966 and renormed five times: in 1974, 1984, 1990, 1998, and 2008.

Research Population & Sample Size

The total sample for all six normative samples included 272,599 kindergarten through 12th grade students and adults.

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TheNextWeb writes on October 4th, 2011 that

92% of the Fortune 500 companies are testing or deploying iPads

Certainly mobile learning and the use of tablets has a significant impact for work and learning in the future!

Read the article below:

 

Tim Cook of Apple is talking iPad during todays Apple event, and has some interesting information to share. The iPad is not just for geeks.

The growth is amazing, and shows that despite other companies getting into the tablet game, the iPad has a secure foothold on the market.

gdgt iphone 5 event 017 520x346 92% of the Fortune 500 companies are testing or deploying iPad

92% of the Fortune 500 companies are testing or deploying iPad

Other people are getting into the market including Samsung and Microsoft, but that is not stopping Apple. At all, and not even close. The ability to capture a market other than regular computer consumers, have helped Apple quite a bit. The younger and older demographics have enjoyed the iPad experience.

And despite everybody and their brother trying to compete with iPad, 3 out of the 4 tablets sold in the US are iPads.

iPad is the undisputed, top selling tablet in the world.

When it comes to business, a market that Microsoft has owned for years, Apple shares numbers showing that the biggest companies in the world are turning to the iPad:

At this point, and this is a stunning number, 92% of the Fortune 500 companies are testing or deploying iPad. It is unheard of.

Tim Cook says that it’s important that Apple customers are happy, which of course brings people back to buy more and more Apple products. They shared a customer satisfaction score to back these claims of happiness up:

The customer satisfaction ratings show a 95% score in a recent survey. They’re showing up everywhere. In schools they’re helping kids learn in amazing new ways. … every state in the US now has an iPad deployment or pilot in place today.

Again, to show how many markets the iPad has touched, Apple points out the surging adoption of the device in schools as well as hospitals:

It’s not just in the classroom. Pilots are replacing 40 pound flight bags with iPads — making pilots more efficient, and planes more fuel efficient. Yes, that’s true!

80% of the top hospitals in the US are now testing or piloting the iPad.

Read our full Apple roundup here, and read all of the Apple announcements here.

Source: http://thenextweb.com/apple/2011/10/04/92-of-the-fortune-500-companies-are-testing-or-deploying-ipad/

NPR reports on two separate stories from the Guardian (original links below)

In an original story by NPR titled: “Report: U.S. Creates Fake Online Identities To Counter ‘Enemy Propaganda'”, they relate that the U.S. Military hired a California company to create software that allows one person to control up to 10 different and sophisticated fake online personas.

The Guardian reported today that United States Central Command (Centcom) doesn’t plan to use the program domestically. Instead, the paper reports quoting Bill Speaks, Centcom spokesman, the military wants to use it in the Middle East and Asia to “counter violent extremist and enemy propaganda outside the US.”

The Guardian adds:

The project has been likened by web experts to China’s attempts to control and restrict free speech on the internet. Critics are likely to complain that it will allow the US military to create a false consensus in online conversations, crowd out unwelcome opinions and smother commentaries or reports that do not correspond with its own objectives.

The Centcom contract stipulates that each fake online persona must have a convincing background, history and supporting details, and that up to 50 US-based controllers should be able to operate false identities from their workstations “without fear of being discovered by sophisticated adversaries”.

In a separate piece at the Guardian, Jeff Jarvis, author of What Would Google Do?, called the whole scheme “appallingly stupid.” He adds:

“The net result of that will be the diminution, not the enhancement, of American credibility.

“But the effort is amusing as well, for there is absolutely no need to spend millions of dollars to create fake identities online.”

So What’s the Point?

As social media increasingly becomes a way of instant/immediate communication and source of news, the US (military) is working to stay ahead of the game. Creating fake identities can help build a mass of social weight to bear against any online opposition and work to sway opinion and dissension by its perceived popularity or population. It can also serve to drown out and bury by it’s weight of numbers oppositional voices or create an illusion of support through those same false identities.  (more to come)

 

Original article source links

 

by Tanya Elias
Athabasca University, Canada

originally appeared in The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning
February – 2011

Abstract

The report extends a previous analysis of universal instructional design principles in distance education by applying them to the design of mobile learning. Eight principles with particular relevance for distance education are selected, and their recommendations are discussed in relation to the design of educational materials for a range of mobile devices. The problems and opportunities of mobile learning are discussed as is the need for educators to focus on content design issues rather than on searching for the next new technology.

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Decline of Creativity

Source: https://belajarmymath.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/creativity-declines-with-age-2/

The standard creativity test which is used in the assessment of creativity is the Torrance Test of Creativity, which was developed by psychologist Ellis Paul Torrance (October 8, 1915  – July 12, 2003) an American psychologist from Milledgeville, Georgia in 1966.

Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) test has had 50 years of research behind it to be considered useful and statistically valid.

The Torrance tests these areas:

  1. Fluency: The total number of responses
  2. Originality: The statistical rarity of the responses
  3. Elaboration: The amount of detail in the responses
  4. Abstractness in Titles
  5. Resistance to Closure

As mentioned in The Creativity Crisis, this is the test that continues to show a decline in creativity among all age groups.

The Flynn Effect

Definition of the Flynn Effect: The substantial and long-sustained increase in both fluid and crystallized intelligence test scores measured in many parts of the world from roughly 1930 to the present day.

It’s important to note that the Flynn Effect–which HAD found a generational RISE in IQ with each new generation since 1930 (and has only just recently stopped).

Contrast that to the Torrance Tests of Creativity which has showed continual DECLINE for the more than a decade.

“It’s good to invest in creative education because these are some of the skills that should be left [after automation],” says Stian Westlake, head of policy and research at Nesta, the UK innovation charity.

Tweet this! While IQ scores continue to increase (Flynn Effect) #Creativity continues to DROP Torrance_test-Factors

SAMPLE TORRANCE TESTS OF CREATIVITY