Top Experts predict what will transform eLearning in 2017

A big THANK YOU to Joomla LMS for including me recently, in their very nice “flip book” of educational technology predictions.

It’s a fantastic compilation of varied educational technology experts.  Out of space concerns, they edited my rather lengthy response (if you’re interested, it’s included in full below).

Embedded below is the flipbook. Click the tiny white arrows to flip through the 14 experts’ opinions.

 

Full site page: elearning edTech Experts Predict the Future

 

My full answer regarding e-Learning Transformation in 2017

It’s an exciting time to be involved in eLearning! As I look ahead to the new year, there are six areas that I believe will transform eLearning in 2017.

First to improve eLearning in the coming year, are the developments in cloud computing and SAAS (the application layer). These technological advances provide for anywhere, anytime, anywhere & any device access to amazing and innovative online tools.

These tools include powerful creation & collaboration applications, interactive media, and opportunities to share and interact with anyone in the world.

These increased computing innovations will lead to continued eLearning advances with both open and proprietary learning management systems (LMS) for creating engaging and interactive learning ecosystems for students, teachers, institutions, and communities. Examples include: Google Classroom, the Award-winning Schoology, and Canvas. Nearly 20 years later, even Blackboard has completely overhauled their LMS to the new cloud-based “Learn Ultra”.

Second is simply the evolution of ideas and the adoption of new and different pedagogies. I believe we’ve finally stopped moving the lecture classroom to the virtual world and are seeing an increase in student-centered courses. Students are excited to have more options with how they engage with the curriculum, while being encouraged to interact with the content. In addition, they’re provided with increased opportunities to interact with classmates, the instructor, and the world. Importantly, they’re given choices in how they’re evaluated and are often able to create demonstrations of understanding and standards mastery.

The combination of technological innovation and changes in learning theory allows for the most important aspect of eLearning, which is the ability to individualize and personalize student learning. This will continue to be a critical driver in 2017 as educators at all levels use eLearning to reach students at whatever level the student is at and, provide an individualized learning pathway that ensures student success.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is rapidly developing and we’ve already started to see the introduction of chatbots into classes. Ashok Goel, a computer science professor at Georgia Tech made news when it was revealed his students didn’t know their TA was in fact an AI chatbot. Microsoft and Facebook are rapidly advancing the development of chatbots. Google recently released their new Pixal phone with built-in AI and as of this writing, ChatBot.org has 77 publicly available and programmable chatbots available for anyone in their education and learning category..

The fifth important factor for eLearning is a good instructor. While the “digital natives” are good with using technology it takes a skilled instructor with expertise and experience to truly connect with students and build relationships that foster student engagement through the virtual morass. In the coming year, more focus will be on instructors making important connections with their learners.

It might sound like a contradiction to tout the advances of AI chatbots in eLearning while also saying human instructors are important but there’s an important difference. AI chatbots take care of the routine, fact-based tasks (ex FAQs)  that can now free-up the teacher to truly teach and work with individuals. Good teachers who are flexible, innovative, creative and can connect and inspire students will be difficult to be replaced by AI.

The last item I believe will transform eLearning in the coming year are certifications earned for successfully completing online courses. Whether an eLearning course is a MOOC or a micro-course, I think we’ll see greater recognition for the value of the learning experience as represented by earning a certificate. More institutions will include them in degree programs. Additionally, more career opportunities will be opened as industries grow to recognize the value of a quality eLearning pathway.

In conclusion, eLearning continues to grow in exciting ways that are being embraced by a wider audience and enhanced with innovative technological advances. Elearning will continue to make an impact on education.

In summary, the items I believe will transform eLearning in 2017 are:

  • Continued advances in cloud computing
  • New instructional models
  • Student-centered learning
  • Artificial intelligence (chatbots), combined with:
  • Great instructors and
  • A greater recognition & applicability for certificates earned online

If you have a thought or question regarding my list of six items, let me know, I’d enjoy hearing from you!

Thank you,

Kevin Corbett

★Consider ADDing These Contributing EdTech Experts To YOUR PLN

New Horizon Report K-12 2016

What’s on the five-year horizon for K-12 Educational Technology & which trends and technologies will drive educational change?

This publication charts the five-year horizon for the impact of emerging technologies in school communities across the globe.

With 15 years of research and publications, the NMC Horizon Project can be regarded as the world’s longest-running exploration of emerging technology trends and uptake in education.

55 experts (listed on page 48) produced the 52 page NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition  and is summarized in the graphic below:
new horizon report k-12_2016

 

The report’s endnotes (pages 49-52) contain 394 valuable reference citations.

DOWNLOAD REPORT

DOWNLOAD: New Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 #EdTech Future http://kevincorbett.com/newhorizon-report-k12-2016/
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DOWNLOAD LINK>> http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2016-nmc-cosn-horizon-report-k12-EN.pdf

Citation:
Adams Becker, S., Freeman, A., Giesinger Hall, C., Cummins, M., and Yuhnke, B. (2016). NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

101 e-Learning Tips From Experts

A FANTASTIC compilation of e-learning tips from MANY established online learning experts, from Scott Hawksworth & Sarah Bass at Best Universities Online.

I am grateful to be able to offer a few contributions and be included among a great field of educators.

Topics include:

  • Time Management Tips for e-Learners
  • Study Tips for e-Learners
  • Useful Apps and Websites for e-Learners
  • General Tips for New e-Learners
  • Best Practice Tips for e-Learning Educators
  • Tech Tips for e-Learning Educators

DOWNLOAD the complete PDF as a resource for your personal use below!

or, view the entire list online at the Best Online Universities website: 101 e-Learning Tips From Experts

 

Flipping the classroom might not be easy, but it puts higher ed students at the center of learning to promote better results.

Results of a survey of 1,089 Faculty Focus readers, between June 15, 2014, and July 20, 2014.

What’s a Flipped Classroom?

flipped-class-higher-edOne of the most interesting themes that emerged from this survey is the amount of confusion about what “flipped” means. Much of the contention about whether a flipped classroom leads to enhanced learning seems to point toward the different ways educators define or conceptualize it.

When asked to define/describe the flipped classroom in their own words, respondents varied in their description.
Some relied on the definitions related to leveraging technology (i.e., videos of lectures), while others described it in terms of active, student-centered, collaborative learning strategies.

The terminology and definitions are causing confusion, but most scholars and survey respondents seem to agree that active learning and student-centered learning approaches are the foundational principles of the flipped philosophy, and the value of this approach is that it can lead to enhanced student engagement, motivation, and learning, if done well.

Highlights from the 16-page report include:

  • More than two-thirds (69.5%) have tried flipping an activity, class, period, or course, and plan to do it again.
    Another 5.49% have tried flipping, but don’t plan to do it again.
  • Roughly one-third (31.8%) of those who have flipped did so within the past year.
  • The majority of faculty who have flipped rated the experience as positive for themselves (70.3%) and their students (64.8%).
  • The Tweet this! Top Reasons for Flipping include a desire to increase Student ENGAGEMENT (79.3%) and improve LEARNING (75.8%).
  • In terms of the actual benefits, nearly three-fourths did see greater student engagement (74.9%), while just over half saw evidence of improved student learning (54.66%).
  • More than 80% said students are more collaborative and 76.61% said they ask more questions, while almost half (48.75%) also noted some student resistance.
  • The most frequently reported barrier for faculty who want to try flipping is limited time. Nearly 70% said it was a very significant challenge (38.1%) or a significant challenge (31.61%).
  • Of those respondents who are not interested in flipped learning, 38.9% said they don’t know enough about it and 27.4% felt it was a fad.

#FlipClass puts #HigherEd students at the center of learning to promote better results.
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Survey respondents sound off on pros and cons of flipping

“The lines have become blurred and people talk about flipped classroom in ways it was never originally designed. The technology-enhanced, non-rigorous flipped classroom should not be confused with research-based active learning pedagogies.”
– Associate professor at a four-year public institution

“It’s very dependent on how well students can be motivated to do the work outside class. When they’re not willing, it’s worse than traditional methods.”
– Instructor at a public, four-year Canadian research-intensive university

“Students in my face-to-face classes thrive on an active learning environment in which they are engaged in a variety of activities.”
– Adjunct professor at a two-year institution

“There is more work involved. It takes more preparation and more emotional energy to be this involved with students.”
– Instructor from a public, four-year institution

  

See More: Blended Learning Videos

 

One of EdTech’s 50 must-read IT bloggers speaks out on the issues in higher education that are shaping the future.

Kevin Corbett is an online learning program developer with a keen interest in social media, gamification and mobile learning.

Kevin Corbett“E-learning will continue to increase and be leveraged in universities to extend learning,” says educator Kevin Corbett.

Corbett’s self-titled blog provides educators with invaluable advice about technology today, along with how-tos they might not get from their institutions. It was recently named one of EdTech’s 2015 “50 Must-Read Higher Ed IT Blogs.”

EdTech recently had the chance to discuss Corbett’s origins as an educator, what piques his interest in the world of educational technology and where he sees institutions leaning in the future.

EDTECH: How did you get started in education, and what has kept you in it?

CORBETT:  During college, I had the opportunity to coach local youth. I was energized at helping young people succeed and inspired with their personal transformation when they earned success. Going into education was important to me for four reasons: because I wanted every student to be successful, to have them feel the personal pride of accomplishment in the classroom, help them develop their interests, and achieve their individual goals.

I’ve stayed in education because I’ve been fortunate to have exceptional administrators who have given me the trust, freedom, and power to develop cutting-edge transformative programs, so students and teachers have positive outcomes and experiences.

EDTECH: Higher education is facing a series of crises — some financial, some regarding the shape of its future iterations. How do you see the higher education world adapting to these challenges? And what role will e-learning play in those changes?

CORBETT:  The complexity and variability of cost models related to higher education make it a difficult problem to understand. Simply, as public subsidies are reduced and tuition increases, it’s problematic for both the institutions and its students. (See: Delta Cost Project)

Tweet this! E-learning will continue to increase and be leveraged in universities to extend learning. I’m please to see some growth in meaningful certifications (when accepted by industry) and competency- based learning, which has potential to reduce per- student overall costs.

Shifting costs to students through rising tuition only, is troubling: 70 percent of students borrowing an average of $33,000; 30 percent in deferment and over $1 trillion dollars in student debt nationally. Tuition costs exceeding income are not indefinitely sustainable. It bothers me to see local high schools pushing every student to attend a four-year university with the myth that a college degree somehow guarantees success in life.

EDTECH: Your blog posts often cover your thoughts on gamification. What was your response to learning that it was being cut as an evolving trend on the 2015 NMC Horizon List? Is there a future for gamification, and how does it work in higher ed classrooms?

CORBETT: I’m not surprised by gamification being dropped from the 2015 NMC Horizon List. There is promise and peril in gamification as it relates to education. I find it’s generally not very well understood how to apply game principles to a course (versus playing a game being “game- based learning”) as it goes beyond simply adding points, badges and leader boards. Engagement and fun are the critical components. Additionally, it can be very time- consuming to develop on the front -end, and I’m not confident there is time or incentive to invest in its development, nor a platform that makes it easy to do so.

EDTECH: The past five years have been truly transformative for universities in the technology sector. Do you foresee a similarly turbulent future in terms of technological progress, or are we at a plateau?

CORBETT: Tweet this! I believe the transformational learning made possible through technology will continue to progress and has potential to improve the higher education learning space.

Any turbulence, I suspect, will come from policy discussions in two places. First, are the policies institutions will be forced to engage in as they confront global technological advances and the need to meet challenges from outside competing forces. Second, will be internal decisions around fundamental questions about how their institution organizes and operates, while also providing rich, engaging learning and teaching opportunities. Personally, I will be most interested in what instructors do during class when all the course content is online. One of my favorites that others could learn from would be Boise State University’s Jackie Gerstein.

EDTECH: You have a rich history in blogging. What advice would you offer those just starting out?

CORBETT: I think it’s important for an individual to establish their own online identity and control the message about themselves that they want public on the Internet. Reputation management can be troubling to professionals who find themselves maligned on the Internet and frustrated with the ease at which other people can post negative things about them. Educators worry about students’ “digital footprints” and “digital tattoos,” yet often neglect their own. Blogging under your own domain name gives you that control.

Here are my personal “Four C’s” for beginning bloggers:

  • Start first with CURATION, by re-posting other’s’ articles that interest you.
  • Next, post the article and COMMENT about it.
  • Third, CREATE your own original article.
  • Lastly, engage with others and CONVERSE with people about mutual interests.

Read more of Corbett’s thoughts on his blog, KevinCorbett.com.

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