eLearning Statistics for 2014

Predicting the Near Future for eLearning

The growth in eLearning is predicted from the past, in a great infographic from The eLearning Industry.

The power and potential for elearning is clear as the infographic focuses on higher education and business in the following areas.

Benefits of Online Learning

  • Money Spent on eLearning continues to grow–DOUBLING by 2015
  • 50% savings, on training with a 60% reduction of time.
  • Half of ALL college classes to be online by 2019.
  • eLearning is Ecologically Friendly with 90% reduction in energy over traditional classes.
  • Increase in Fortune 500 company use with over 41% now using technology for instruction.
  • Self-paced Industry growth with the most rapid growth in developing nations.
  • Productivity boost with a calculation of $30 worth of productivity for every $1 spent.
  • Companies offering online learning retain more employees and generate more revenue per employee.
  • 72% of companies surveyed stated eLearning keeps them up-to-date with industry changes and makes them more competitive.

Top 10 eLearning Statistics for 2014

 

eLearning Statistics for 2014

Source: http://www.elearningindustry.com

Major EdTech Trends for 2013 [INFOGRAPHIC]


Mobile Learning Infographic
 

Source: http://www.onlinecolleges.net

More on Mobile Learning

Choosing the Right HigherEd Degree Infographic

 Source: http://www.gradschoolhub.com/choosing/

Choosing the Right Degree

What matters most when choosing a graduate degree? Money? Doing something you love? The journey to finding the right master’s degree can be a long one.

What Do You Want?

– Consider these options when choosing a graduate school:

  • Location
  • Quality of life
  • Degree programs offered
  • Cost
  • Time
  • Resources
  • Faculty
  • On-campus or online
  • Ranking
  • Accreditation

“Love what you do and do what you love.” – Ray Bradbury, author

What Do You Like?

– Think about the things in your life that excite you. There may well be a master’s degree option that allows you to truly do what you love.

The Realistic Path

– If you like to…

  • Do things with your hands
  • Be outside
  • Work with real-world materials
  • Work solo

– Consider these fields: farmer/rancher, surveyor, forester, mechanical drafter, technician, firefighter, correctional officer, animal control worker, chef, landscaping, carpenter, explosive worker, machine operator, repairer, machinist, agricultural inspector, animal breeder, jeweler, precious-metals worker, pilot
– Possible degree
– Oregon State University
– Master of Forestry
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $13,188
– Non-resident: $21,219

The Investigative Path

– If you like to…

  • Do an extensive amount of thinking
  • Mentally search for facts and figures

– Consider these fields: coroner, computer and information scientist, engineer, animal scientist, biologist, physicist, chemist, economist, anthropologist, archeologist, geographer, historian, political scientist, astronomer, sociologist, dentist, nutritionist, veterinarian, detective
– Possible degree
– University of Colorado-Denver
– Master of Science in Chemistry
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $5,087
– Non-resident: $15,619

The Artistic Path

– If you like to…

  • Work with form, design and pattern
  • Express yourself
  • Not follow a clear set of rules

– Consider these fields: architect, art director, fine artist, animator, fashion designer, actor, dancer, musician, graphic designer, interior designer, creative writer, film editor, makeup artist, choreographer
– Possible degree
– Parsons The New School for Design, New York City
– Master of Fashion Studies
– Average graduate tuition
– $20,855

The Social Path

– If you like to…

  • Work with, communicate and teach people
  • Help others

– Consider these fields: social worker, probation officer, counselor, health educator, clergy, teacher, nurse, physical therapist, athletic trainer, speech-language pathologist, child care worker
– Possible degree
– Loyola University (Illinois)
– Master of Social Work
– Average graduate tuition
– $13,950

The Enterprising Path

– If you like to…

  • Start and carry out projects
  • Make many decisions
  • Take risks
  • Deal with business

– Consider these fields: chief executive, general manager, legislator, manager, education administrator, funeral director, logisticians, producer, program director, copy writer, head cook, special agent, PR specialist, insurance agent, product promoter, ship captain
– Possible degree
– Central Michigan University
– Master of Science in Administration
– Average graduate tuition
– $7,305

The Conventional Path

– If you like to…

  • Follow set procedures and routines
  • Work with data and details
  • Follow authority

– Consider these fields: treasurer, controller, insurance adjuster, accountant, auditor, financial analyst, loan officer, tax preparer, database administrator, librarian, medical transcriptionist, proofreader, inspector
– Possible degree
– William & Mary, Williamsburg, Va.
– Master of Accounting
– Average graduate tuition
– Resident: $29,610
– Non-resident: $40,010

Know Your Financial Aid Options

– To be sure, financing a graduate degree can be an expensive proposition. But consider the various types of financial aid available.

  • Scholarships
  • Grants
  • Veteran’s education benefits
  • Loans
  • Employer-based aid
  • Teaching and research assistantships

It’s About Getting a Job, Right?

Top graduate degrees for pay and career growth through 2020:

Mid-career pay Projected growth by 2020

– 1. Physician assistant studies $97,000 30%
– 2. Computer science $109,000 22.3%
– 3. Electrical engineering $121,000 17.7%
– 4. Mathematics (tie) $91,000 24.7%
– 4. Information systems (tie) $95,500 23.3%
– 6. Physics $114,000 20.3%
– 7. Occupational therapy $79,200 33%
– 8. Healthcare administration $87,800 22%
– 9. Nursing $85,900 21.7%
– 10. Economics $115,000 14.3%

Time an Issue? Consider Online

Top online graduate schools:

  • Washington State University 
    Cost: $509 per credit
    Top programs: Business and engineering
  • Duke University – Fuqua School of Business 
    Cost: $6,381per year
    Top programs: MBA, executive MBA
  • St. John’s University 
    Cost: $35,520 per year
    Top programs: Law, education
  • Carnegie Mellon University 
    Cost: $453-$540 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, business, computer science
  • Stanford University
    Cost: $890 per credit hour
    Top programs: Law, engineering, medicine
  • Columbia University
    Cost: $628 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, computer information technology
  • Penn State University
    Cost: $8,222 per year, in-state
    Top programs: Clinical psychology, engineering, education
  • Arizona State University
    Cost: $463 per credit hour
    Top programs: Engineering, education
  • Central Michigan University
    Cost: $477 per credit hour
    Top programs: Business, education
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Cost: $1,100 per credit hour
    Top programs: Production/operations, supply chain/logistics, chemical engineering, civil engineering, physics

SOURCES
– http://www.campusexplorer.com
– http://mappingyourfuture.org
– http://oregonstate.edu
– http://www.ucdenver.edu
– http://www.newschool.edu
– http://www.luc.edu
– http://global.cmich.edu
– http://mason.wm.edu
– http://www.emory.edu
– http://www.forbes.com

 

The Value of Online Degrees

As more institutions provide opportunities for people to earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees online, the question becomes: What Good Are They?

3-criteria-info-chip

click for full-size infographic

In the following infographic by Drexel University, they pull together research and employer interviews to see what’s being looked at between online degrees and traditional degrees.

When online degrees meet THREE criteria, they are considered equal to traditional degrees.

  1. The institution is Accredited by Regionally
  2. The online degree is offered by a school with a traditional campus
  3. The school is an Established Brand

 Some factoids from Drexel’s research:

  • US News and World Report will only include REGIONALLY accredited programs in their annual list of Best Online Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree Programs
  • Out of the executives who believe online degrees are equivalent to traditional degrees. ALL say that accreditation is a major factor that makes online degrees more credible. Source: Zogby International Survey and InsideHigherEd.com
  • Out of the top 10 online bachelor’s programs in the US, ALL have a traditional campus. Source: US News & World Report
  • 76% of academic leaders believe online degrees are EQUAL to traditional degrees
  • 89% of academic leaders believe online degrees are EQUAL to traditional degrees if the school has a traditional campus.
  • When hiring managers evaluate education credentials, FAVORABILITY of online degrees increased with brick-and-mortar universities.
  • Hiring Managers give online degrees a 42% favorability if it is an online-only university.
  • Hiring Managers give online degrees a 92% favorability if it is a brick-and-mortar university.

Source: http://www.drexel.com/online-degree-vs-traditional-degree

The increase in the use of mobile devices to access the Internet makes it possible for a new mobile workforce who is connected to their office or staff via the internet-connected device!

Are you more or less productive by a drive through rush hour to work? Could you save time and money AND be more productive if you didn’t have to be in a specific location at a certain time?

Mobile Workforce says “No to the Office”

Is the 9-to-5 commute over? Until maybe only recently, you were expected to drive to work, clock-in, put in your hours and fight your way back home in rush hour. Once you left work, you were done until you came back into work the next way.

Mobile workers are those who work at least 10 hours per week away from home and from their main place of work, e.g. on business trips, in the field, travelling or on customers’ premises, and use online computer connections when doing so. (Source: Cisco: Understanding and Managing the Mobile Workforce/ Electronic Commerce and Telework Trends, 2000.ii)

A growing number of workers using mobile devices are doing things differently. Whether it’s smartphones, tablets, or laptops, the need to report to a building, an office and a workstation is rapidly changing with the increase in a mobile workforce because you can communicate, produce and work remotely.

Find below an infographic with some interesting stats regarding the changes for a mobile workforce. (click for larger image)

mobile workforce

 

Source: Technology In Business

From the Sloan Consortium comes the tenth annual survey titled: Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States.

The higher education eLearning survey is a collaborative effort between the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, and purports itself to be the leading barometer of online learning in the United States.

 

“The rate of growth in online enrollments remains extremely robust,” said study co-author Jeff Seaman, Co-Director of the Babson Survey Research Group. “This is somewhat surprising given that overall higher education enrollments actually declined during this period.”

 

Ten Key eLearning Report Findings include:

changing-course-infographic
  • Over 6.7 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2011 term, an increase of 570,000 students over the previous year.
  • Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.
  • 77% of academic leaders surveyed reported online learning outcomes to be the same, somewhat superior or superior to face-to-face in 2012.
  • 45% of CAOs agree that it takes more faculty time and effort to
    teach an online course than a face-to-face course.
  • Only 2.6% higher education institutions currently have a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), another 9.4 percent report MOOCs are in the planning stages.
  • Academic LEADERS remain unconvinced that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses, but do believe that they provide an important means for institutions to learn about online pedagogy.
  • Seventy-seven percent of academic leaders rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face.
  • Only 30.2 percent of chief academic OFFICERS believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education – a rate is lower than recorded in 2004.
  • The proportion of chief academic LEADERS that say that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy is at a new high of 69.1 percent.
  • A majority of chief academic officers at all types of institutions continue to believe that lower retention rates for online courses are a barrier to the wide-spread adoption of online education.

DOWNLOAD the Full eLearning Report

 

Source:
http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/changing_course_2012