#TxEduChat LOGOSunday, April 24th at 8PM Central (6PM Pacific)

Thanks to @Tom_Kilgore and the popular @TxEduChat for asking me to host another Twitter Chat!

I’m excited to have some fun and explore the topic:

AI & Robots: How can we “future proof” students?

Artificial Intelligence and Robots are developing are a RAPID pace!

With two new grandchildren, I’m investigating more seriously the advancing new technologies in an effort to understand the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve happiness and success in a technological future.

I’m certain that the ubiquitous nature of technology will have a considerable impact on a new generation and believe that adults–educators, parents, and more, will be critical in mentoring young people as they navigate and work through all the changes, along with new moral and ethical decisions mankind has never had to deal with.

Sunday’s TXeduchat is intended to be a fun-filled hour to consider the possibilities and get us all thinking about how to future proof our students in a world where deep learning, automation, artificial intelligence, and robotics are accelerating.

It will be hard to accomplish too much in the hour we have online but, there are a lot of amazing and brilliant people that frequent the #TxEduChat, so I’m confident it’s going to be a frenetic paced evening!

For those of you who are here for the first time. I’ll post a reference link below after the chat.

 

101 e-Learning Tips From Experts

A FANTASTIC compilation of e-learning tips from MANY established online learning experts, from Scott Hawksworth & Sarah Bass at Best Universities Online.

I am grateful to be able to offer a few contributions and be included among a great field of educators.

Topics include:

  • Time Management Tips for e-Learners
  • Study Tips for e-Learners
  • Useful Apps and Websites for e-Learners
  • General Tips for New e-Learners
  • Best Practice Tips for e-Learning Educators
  • Tech Tips for e-Learning Educators

DOWNLOAD the complete PDF as a resource for your personal use below!

or, view the entire list online at the Best Online Universities website: 101 e-Learning Tips From Experts

 

Flipping the classroom might not be easy, but it puts higher ed students at the center of learning to promote better results.

Results of a survey of 1,089 Faculty Focus readers, between June 15, 2014, and July 20, 2014.

What’s a Flipped Classroom?

flipped-class-higher-edOne of the most interesting themes that emerged from this survey is the amount of confusion about what “flipped” means. Much of the contention about whether a flipped classroom leads to enhanced learning seems to point toward the different ways educators define or conceptualize it.

When asked to define/describe the flipped classroom in their own words, respondents varied in their description.
Some relied on the definitions related to leveraging technology (i.e., videos of lectures), while others described it in terms of active, student-centered, collaborative learning strategies.

The terminology and definitions are causing confusion, but most scholars and survey respondents seem to agree that active learning and student-centered learning approaches are the foundational principles of the flipped philosophy, and the value of this approach is that it can lead to enhanced student engagement, motivation, and learning, if done well.

Highlights from the 16-page report include:

  • More than two-thirds (69.5%) have tried flipping an activity, class, period, or course, and plan to do it again.
    Another 5.49% have tried flipping, but don’t plan to do it again.
  • Roughly one-third (31.8%) of those who have flipped did so within the past year.
  • The majority of faculty who have flipped rated the experience as positive for themselves (70.3%) and their students (64.8%).
  • The Tweet this! Top Reasons for Flipping include a desire to increase Student ENGAGEMENT (79.3%) and improve LEARNING (75.8%).
  • In terms of the actual benefits, nearly three-fourths did see greater student engagement (74.9%), while just over half saw evidence of improved student learning (54.66%).
  • More than 80% said students are more collaborative and 76.61% said they ask more questions, while almost half (48.75%) also noted some student resistance.
  • The most frequently reported barrier for faculty who want to try flipping is limited time. Nearly 70% said it was a very significant challenge (38.1%) or a significant challenge (31.61%).
  • Of those respondents who are not interested in flipped learning, 38.9% said they don’t know enough about it and 27.4% felt it was a fad.

#FlipClass puts #HigherEd students at the center of learning to promote better results.
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Survey respondents sound off on pros and cons of flipping

“The lines have become blurred and people talk about flipped classroom in ways it was never originally designed. The technology-enhanced, non-rigorous flipped classroom should not be confused with research-based active learning pedagogies.”
– Associate professor at a four-year public institution

“It’s very dependent on how well students can be motivated to do the work outside class. When they’re not willing, it’s worse than traditional methods.”
– Instructor at a public, four-year Canadian research-intensive university

“Students in my face-to-face classes thrive on an active learning environment in which they are engaged in a variety of activities.”
– Adjunct professor at a two-year institution

“There is more work involved. It takes more preparation and more emotional energy to be this involved with students.”
– Instructor from a public, four-year institution

  

See More: Blended Learning Videos

 

VR = Virtual Reality
IoT = Internet of Things

From medicine to science and engineering, VR and related technologies could soon change teaching and learning.

Virtual Reality and the IoT Can Fuel a Connected, Gesture-Driven Classroom
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I think Mr. Walter’s November 2nd article in EdTech HigherEd,  is forward thinking in his recent observation about the the increased use of Virtual Reality in Higher Education and it’s connection to the Internet of Things— a natural progression for research universities in all subject domains (and most definitely not going to be found in an under-classman’s large lecture hall).

One aspect of the article I don’t believe can be emphasized enough is Google’s involvement. He writes:

“Google is accelerating the march forward toward a more gesture-fueled Internet of Things. The company unveiled projects this year that incorporate not only virtual reality, but also a technology called augmented reality: a view of the real-world environment that is supplemented by computer-generated sounds, video and graphics.

Google’s major movement into the space, Project Tango, allows tablets, robots and other devices to use spatial and dimensional understanding of their environments. For example, one could use a tablet to scan a room and create a 3D map of the space, which could then be used by an architect or designer for space planning.”

From medicine to science and engineering, VR and related technologies could soon change teaching and learning.
Tweet Quote

See a Previous Post on the Internet of Things (iot)

Original Source article: http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2015/11/virtual-reality-iot-connected-gesture-classroom
by Derek Walter

One of EdTech’s 50 must-read IT bloggers speaks out on the issues in higher education that are shaping the future.

Kevin Corbett is an online learning program developer with a keen interest in social media, gamification and mobile learning.

Kevin Corbett“E-learning will continue to increase and be leveraged in universities to extend learning,” says educator Kevin Corbett.

Corbett’s self-titled blog provides educators with invaluable advice about technology today, along with how-tos they might not get from their institutions. It was recently named one of EdTech’s 2015 “50 Must-Read Higher Ed IT Blogs.”

EdTech recently had the chance to discuss Corbett’s origins as an educator, what piques his interest in the world of educational technology and where he sees institutions leaning in the future.

EDTECH: How did you get started in education, and what has kept you in it?

CORBETT:  During college, I had the opportunity to coach local youth. I was energized at helping young people succeed and inspired with their personal transformation when they earned success. Going into education was important to me for four reasons: because I wanted every student to be successful, to have them feel the personal pride of accomplishment in the classroom, help them develop their interests, and achieve their individual goals.

I’ve stayed in education because I’ve been fortunate to have exceptional administrators who have given me the trust, freedom, and power to develop cutting-edge transformative programs, so students and teachers have positive outcomes and experiences.

EDTECH: Higher education is facing a series of crises — some financial, some regarding the shape of its future iterations. How do you see the higher education world adapting to these challenges? And what role will e-learning play in those changes?

CORBETT:  The complexity and variability of cost models related to higher education make it a difficult problem to understand. Simply, as public subsidies are reduced and tuition increases, it’s problematic for both the institutions and its students. (See: Delta Cost Project)

Tweet this! E-learning will continue to increase and be leveraged in universities to extend learning. I’m please to see some growth in meaningful certifications (when accepted by industry) and competency- based learning, which has potential to reduce per- student overall costs.

Shifting costs to students through rising tuition only, is troubling: 70 percent of students borrowing an average of $33,000; 30 percent in deferment and over $1 trillion dollars in student debt nationally. Tuition costs exceeding income are not indefinitely sustainable. It bothers me to see local high schools pushing every student to attend a four-year university with the myth that a college degree somehow guarantees success in life.

EDTECH: Your blog posts often cover your thoughts on gamification. What was your response to learning that it was being cut as an evolving trend on the 2015 NMC Horizon List? Is there a future for gamification, and how does it work in higher ed classrooms?

CORBETT: I’m not surprised by gamification being dropped from the 2015 NMC Horizon List. There is promise and peril in gamification as it relates to education. I find it’s generally not very well understood how to apply game principles to a course (versus playing a game being “game- based learning”) as it goes beyond simply adding points, badges and leader boards. Engagement and fun are the critical components. Additionally, it can be very time- consuming to develop on the front -end, and I’m not confident there is time or incentive to invest in its development, nor a platform that makes it easy to do so.

EDTECH: The past five years have been truly transformative for universities in the technology sector. Do you foresee a similarly turbulent future in terms of technological progress, or are we at a plateau?

CORBETT: Tweet this! I believe the transformational learning made possible through technology will continue to progress and has potential to improve the higher education learning space.

Any turbulence, I suspect, will come from policy discussions in two places. First, are the policies institutions will be forced to engage in as they confront global technological advances and the need to meet challenges from outside competing forces. Second, will be internal decisions around fundamental questions about how their institution organizes and operates, while also providing rich, engaging learning and teaching opportunities. Personally, I will be most interested in what instructors do during class when all the course content is online. One of my favorites that others could learn from would be Boise State University’s Jackie Gerstein.

EDTECH: You have a rich history in blogging. What advice would you offer those just starting out?

CORBETT: I think it’s important for an individual to establish their own online identity and control the message about themselves that they want public on the Internet. Reputation management can be troubling to professionals who find themselves maligned on the Internet and frustrated with the ease at which other people can post negative things about them. Educators worry about students’ “digital footprints” and “digital tattoos,” yet often neglect their own. Blogging under your own domain name gives you that control.

Here are my personal “Four C’s” for beginning bloggers:

  • Start first with CURATION, by re-posting other’s’ articles that interest you.
  • Next, post the article and COMMENT about it.
  • Third, CREATE your own original article.
  • Lastly, engage with others and CONVERSE with people about mutual interests.

Read more of Corbett’s thoughts on his blog, KevinCorbett.com.

SCYTHER5/THINKSTOCK

Delta Cost Project

Delta Cost Project Logo
The Delta Cost Project should be on top of everyone’s list for information related to Higher Education economics.

On their site you’ll be able to:

  • Explore their database and create reports on higher education spending, performance, and more.
    Outstanding #HigherEd Trends & Data Updates
  • Find out how colleges in your state are spending money and performing.
  • Learn what research shows about higher education spending, tuition, subsidies, and outcomes.
  • Delve into hot topics that put rising tuition in perspective.
  • Explore data and create reports on higher education spending, performance, and more.

I find valuable their presenting the BIG PICTURE and an in-depth perspective of college funding, especially when faced with the quick, emotional blips heard in the media about rising tuition and university spending.

Here is an excellent example:

delta-cost-project