HAL 9000 Artificial Intelligence (from movie 2001)

“Robotics and AI have become one of the most prominent technological trends of our century.
The fast increase of their use and development brings new and difficult challenges to our society”, writes Delvaux. Therefore, the reasoning goes, “robots and artificial intelligence (AI) would increase their interaction with humans”, raising “legal and ethical issues which require a prompt intervention at EU level”.

I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That*

Science fiction meets science fact and thee three laws of robots just appeared in a draft European Parliament committee report on robots and artificial intelligence titled: Workshop on Robotics & Artificial Intelligence.

While it is a non-binding document, these rules could be adopted by the EU this month.

Read the full article: http://delano.lu/d/detail/news/im-afraid-i-cant-do/132457

IF you’re not familiar with where the title of the article comes from, you MUST watch the historical scene (2:11 min)  from the ground-breaking 1968 movie 2001.
The movie is partially based on Arthur C. Clarke’s short story The Sentinal, first published in a fantasy magazine (1951).

In the clip, astronaut Dave argues with HAL9000 AI:

3 Laws For Robots

The Three Laws of Robotics (often shortened to The Three Laws or known as Asimov’s Laws) are a set of rules devised by the science fiction author Isaac Asimov involving artificial intelligence and explained by him in the archived video below.

The rules were first introduced in his 1942 short story “Runaround“, although they had been foreshadowed in a few earlier stories. The Three Laws, quoted as being from the “Handbook of Robotics, 56th Edition, 2058 A.D.”, are:

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.

Top Experts predict what will transform eLearning in 2017

A big THANK YOU to Joomla LMS for including me recently, in their very nice “flip book” of educational technology predictions.

It’s a fantastic compilation of varied educational technology experts.  Out of space concerns, they edited my rather lengthy response (if you’re interested, it’s included in full below).

Embedded below is the flipbook. Click the tiny white arrows to flip through the 14 experts’ opinions.

 

Full site page: elearning edTech Experts Predict the Future

 

My full answer regarding e-Learning Transformation in 2017

It’s an exciting time to be involved in eLearning! As I look ahead to the new year, there are six areas that I believe will transform eLearning in 2017.

First to improve eLearning in the coming year, are the developments in cloud computing and SAAS (the application layer). These technological advances provide for anywhere, anytime, anywhere & any device access to amazing and innovative online tools.

These tools include powerful creation & collaboration applications, interactive media, and opportunities to share and interact with anyone in the world.

These increased computing innovations will lead to continued eLearning advances with both open and proprietary learning management systems (LMS) for creating engaging and interactive learning ecosystems for students, teachers, institutions, and communities. Examples include: Google Classroom, the Award-winning Schoology, and Canvas. Nearly 20 years later, even Blackboard has completely overhauled their LMS to the new cloud-based “Learn Ultra”.

Second is simply the evolution of ideas and the adoption of new and different pedagogies. I believe we’ve finally stopped moving the lecture classroom to the virtual world and are seeing an increase in student-centered courses. Students are excited to have more options with how they engage with the curriculum, while being encouraged to interact with the content. In addition, they’re provided with increased opportunities to interact with classmates, the instructor, and the world. Importantly, they’re given choices in how they’re evaluated and are often able to create demonstrations of understanding and standards mastery.

The combination of technological innovation and changes in learning theory allows for the most important aspect of eLearning, which is the ability to individualize and personalize student learning. This will continue to be a critical driver in 2017 as educators at all levels use eLearning to reach students at whatever level the student is at and, provide an individualized learning pathway that ensures student success.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is rapidly developing and we’ve already started to see the introduction of chatbots into classes. Ashok Goel, a computer science professor at Georgia Tech made news when it was revealed his students didn’t know their TA was in fact an AI chatbot. Microsoft and Facebook are rapidly advancing the development of chatbots. Google recently released their new Pixal phone with built-in AI and as of this writing, ChatBot.org has 77 publicly available and programmable chatbots available for anyone in their education and learning category..

The fifth important factor for eLearning is a good instructor. While the “digital natives” are good with using technology it takes a skilled instructor with expertise and experience to truly connect with students and build relationships that foster student engagement through the virtual morass. In the coming year, more focus will be on instructors making important connections with their learners.

It might sound like a contradiction to tout the advances of AI chatbots in eLearning while also saying human instructors are important but there’s an important difference. AI chatbots take care of the routine, fact-based tasks (ex FAQs)  that can now free-up the teacher to truly teach and work with individuals. Good teachers who are flexible, innovative, creative and can connect and inspire students will be difficult to be replaced by AI.

The last item I believe will transform eLearning in the coming year are certifications earned for successfully completing online courses. Whether an eLearning course is a MOOC or a micro-course, I think we’ll see greater recognition for the value of the learning experience as represented by earning a certificate. More institutions will include them in degree programs. Additionally, more career opportunities will be opened as industries grow to recognize the value of a quality eLearning pathway.

In conclusion, eLearning continues to grow in exciting ways that are being embraced by a wider audience and enhanced with innovative technological advances. Elearning will continue to make an impact on education.

In summary, the items I believe will transform eLearning in 2017 are:

  • Continued advances in cloud computing
  • New instructional models
  • Student-centered learning
  • Artificial intelligence (chatbots), combined with:
  • Great instructors and
  • A greater recognition & applicability for certificates earned online

If you have a thought or question regarding my list of six items, let me know, I’d enjoy hearing from you!

Thank you,

Kevin Corbett

★Consider ADDing These Contributing EdTech Experts To YOUR PLN

New Horizon Report K-12 2016

What’s on the five-year horizon for K-12 Educational Technology & which trends and technologies will drive educational change?

This publication charts the five-year horizon for the impact of emerging technologies in school communities across the globe.

With 15 years of research and publications, the NMC Horizon Project can be regarded as the world’s longest-running exploration of emerging technology trends and uptake in education.

55 experts (listed on page 48) produced the 52 page NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition  and is summarized in the graphic below:
new horizon report k-12_2016

 

The report’s endnotes (pages 49-52) contain 394 valuable reference citations.

DOWNLOAD REPORT

DOWNLOAD: New Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 #EdTech Future http://kevincorbett.com/newhorizon-report-k12-2016/
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DOWNLOAD LINK>> http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2016-nmc-cosn-horizon-report-k12-EN.pdf

Citation:
Adams Becker, S., Freeman, A., Giesinger Hall, C., Cummins, M., and Yuhnke, B. (2016). NMC/CoSN Horizon Report: 2016 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

#TxEduChat LOGOSunday, April 24th at 8PM Central (6PM Pacific)

Thanks to @Tom_Kilgore and the popular @TxEduChat for asking me to host another Twitter Chat!

I’m excited to have some fun and explore the topic:

AI & Robots: How can we “future proof” students?

Artificial Intelligence and Robots are developing are a RAPID pace!

With two new grandchildren, I’m investigating more seriously the advancing new technologies in an effort to understand the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve happiness and success in a technological future.

I’m certain that the ubiquitous nature of technology will have a considerable impact on a new generation and believe that adults–educators, parents, and more, will be critical in mentoring young people as they navigate and work through all the changes, along with new moral and ethical decisions mankind has never had to deal with.

Sunday’s TXeduchat is intended to be a fun-filled hour to consider the possibilities and get us all thinking about how to future proof our students in a world where deep learning, automation, artificial intelligence, and robotics are accelerating.

It will be hard to accomplish too much in the hour we have online but, there are a lot of amazing and brilliant people that frequent the #TxEduChat, so I’m confident it’s going to be a frenetic paced evening!

For those of you who are here for the first time. I’ll post a reference link below after the chat.

 

The Future of Employment Research Report from Oxford University

In this report, Oxford University addresses the question: How susceptible are jobs to computerization?

Doing so, they build on the existing literature in two ways. First, drawing upon recent advances in Machine Learning (ML) and Mobile Robotics (MR), they develop a novel methodology to categorize occupations according to their susceptibility to computerization.

702 Occupations Examined

Second, they implement this methodology to estimate the probability of computerization for 702 detailed occupations, and examine expected impacts of future computerization on US labor market outcomes.

Continue Reading…

The rapid pace of artificial intelligence (AI) has raised fears about whether robots could act unethically or soon choose to harm humans. Some are calling for bans on robotics research; others are calling for more research to understand how AI might be constrained. But how can robots learn ethical behavior if there is no “user manual” for being human?

Continue Reading…