A research study from The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Ochsner Clinical School, New Orleans, LA

[sociallocker id=3591]DOWNLOAD the Study: Using Flipped Classroom To Bridge The Gap to Generation Y [5 page PDF][/sociallocker]

Background

The flipped classroom is a student-centered approach to learning that increases active learning for the student compared to traditional classroom-based instruction. In the flipped classroom model, students are first exposed to the learning material through didactics outside of the classroom, usually in the form of written material, voice-over lectures, or videos.

During the formal teaching time, an instructor facilitates student-driven discussion of the material via case scenarios, allowing for complex problem solving, peer interaction, and a deep understanding of the concepts. A successful flipped classroom should have three goals:

  1. Allow the students to become critical thinkers
  2. Fully engage students and instructors
  3. Stimulate the development of a deep understanding of the material.

The flipped classroom model includes teaching and learning methods that can appeal to all four generations in the academic environment.

Results

When comparing the students taught by traditional methods to those taught in the flipped classroom model, saw a statistically significant increase in test scores in Rotation 2.

While the average score for the flipped classroom group increased in Rotation 3 on the obstetrics section, the difference was not statistically significant.

Unexpectedly, the average score on the gynecology portion of the multiple-choice question examination decreased among the flipped classroom group compared to the traditional teaching group, and this decrease was statistically significant.

For both the obstetrics and the gynecology portions, researchers found statistically significant increases in the scores for the flipped classroom group in both Rotation 2 and Rotation 3 compared to the traditional teaching group.

With the exception of the gynecology portion of the multiple-choice question examination in Rotation 3, we saw improvement in scores after the implementation of the flipped classroom.

CHART-flipclass-genY-research

Conclusion

The flipped classroom is a feasible and useful alternative to the traditional classroom. It is a method that embraces Generation Y’s need for active learning in a group setting while maintaining a traditional classroom method for introducing the information.

Tweet this! #FlipClass Embraces #GenY Need for Active Learning & Maintains Traditional Classrooms

Active learning increases student engagement and can lead to improved retention of material as demonstrated on standard examinations.

[sociallocker id=3591]DOWNLOAD the Study: Using Flipped Classroom To Bridge The Gap to Generation Y [5 page PDF][/sociallocker]

A randomized, controlled research study from the China Medical Board published this week found undergraduate medical students learned  principles of electrocardiogram better with a flipped-learning instructional model.

Background

Interpreting an electrocardiogram (ECG) is not only one of the most important parts of clinical diagnostics but also one of the most difficult topics to teach and learn. In order to enable medical students to master ECG interpretation skills in a limited teaching period, the flipped teaching method has been recommended by previous research to improve teaching effect on undergraduate ECG learning.

Methods

A randomized controlled trial for ECG learning was conducted, involving 181 junior-year medical undergraduates using a flipped classroom as an experimental intervention, compared with Lecture-Based Learning (LBL) as a control group. All participants took an examination one week after the intervention by analysing 20 ECGs from actual clinical cases and submitting their ECG reports. A self-administered questionnaire was also used to evaluate the students’ attitudes, total learning time, and conditions under each teaching method.

Results

The students in the experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group (8.72 ± 1.01 vs 8.03 ± 1.01, t = 4.549, P = 0.000) on ECG interpretation. The vast majority of the students in the flipped classroom group held positive attitudes toward the flipped classroom method and also supported LBL. There was no significant difference (4.07 ± 0.96 vs 4.16 ± 0.89, Z = − 0.948, P = 0.343) between the groups. Prior to class, the students in the flipped class group devoted significantly more time than those in the control group (42.33 ± 22.19 vs 30.55 ± 10.15, t = 4.586, P = 0.000), whereas after class, the time spent by the two groups were not significantly different (56.50 ± 46.80 vs 54.62 ± 31.77, t = 0.317, P = 0.752).

Conclusion
Flipped classroom teaching can improve medical students’ interest in learning and their self-learning abilities. It is an effective teaching model that needs to be further studied and promoted.

Source:
Friend or Foe? Flipped Classroom for Undergraduate Electrocardiogram Learning: a Randomized Controlled Study

MORE on Flipped Class & BLENDED LEARNING