101 e-Learning Tips From Experts

A FANTASTIC compilation of e-learning tips from MANY established online learning experts, from Scott Hawksworth & Sarah Bass at Best Universities Online.

I am grateful to be able to offer a few contributions and be included among a great field of educators.

Topics include:

  • Time Management Tips for e-Learners
  • Study Tips for e-Learners
  • Useful Apps and Websites for e-Learners
  • General Tips for New e-Learners
  • Best Practice Tips for e-Learning Educators
  • Tech Tips for e-Learning Educators

DOWNLOAD the complete PDF as a resource for your personal use below!

or, view the entire list online at the Best Online Universities website: 101 e-Learning Tips From Experts

 

Toyota is investing $1 billion in a research company it’s setting up in Silicon Valley to develop artificial intelligence and robotics, underlining the Japanese automaker’s determination to lead in futuristic cars that drive themselves and to apply the technology to other areas of daily life.

Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda said Friday that the company will start operating in January with 200 employees at a facility near Stanford University. A second facility will be established near Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

The investment, which will be spread over five years, comes on top of $50 million Toyota announced earlier for artificial intelligence research at Stanford and MIT.

Toyota said its interest extended beyond autonomous driving, which is starting to be offered by some automakers and being promised by almost all of them.

Toyota has already shown an R2-D2-like robot (called the Toyota Partner Robot Family) designed to help the elderly, the sick and people in wheelchairs by picking up and carrying objects. The automaker has also shown human-shaped entertainment robots that can converse and play musical instruments. As the world’s top auto manufacturer, Toyota already uses sophisticated robotic arms and computers in auto production, including doing paint jobs and screwing in parts.

Read the rest of the article at: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-toyota-silicon-valley-20151106-story.html

Flipping the classroom might not be easy, but it puts higher ed students at the center of learning to promote better results.

Results of a survey of 1,089 Faculty Focus readers, between June 15, 2014, and July 20, 2014.

What’s a Flipped Classroom?

flipped-class-higher-edOne of the most interesting themes that emerged from this survey is the amount of confusion about what “flipped” means. Much of the contention about whether a flipped classroom leads to enhanced learning seems to point toward the different ways educators define or conceptualize it.

When asked to define/describe the flipped classroom in their own words, respondents varied in their description.
Some relied on the definitions related to leveraging technology (i.e., videos of lectures), while others described it in terms of active, student-centered, collaborative learning strategies.

The terminology and definitions are causing confusion, but most scholars and survey respondents seem to agree that active learning and student-centered learning approaches are the foundational principles of the flipped philosophy, and the value of this approach is that it can lead to enhanced student engagement, motivation, and learning, if done well.

Highlights from the 16-page report include:

  • More than two-thirds (69.5%) have tried flipping an activity, class, period, or course, and plan to do it again.
    Another 5.49% have tried flipping, but don’t plan to do it again.
  • Roughly one-third (31.8%) of those who have flipped did so within the past year.
  • The majority of faculty who have flipped rated the experience as positive for themselves (70.3%) and their students (64.8%).
  • The Tweet this! Top Reasons for Flipping include a desire to increase Student ENGAGEMENT (79.3%) and improve LEARNING (75.8%).
  • In terms of the actual benefits, nearly three-fourths did see greater student engagement (74.9%), while just over half saw evidence of improved student learning (54.66%).
  • More than 80% said students are more collaborative and 76.61% said they ask more questions, while almost half (48.75%) also noted some student resistance.
  • The most frequently reported barrier for faculty who want to try flipping is limited time. Nearly 70% said it was a very significant challenge (38.1%) or a significant challenge (31.61%).
  • Of those respondents who are not interested in flipped learning, 38.9% said they don’t know enough about it and 27.4% felt it was a fad.

#FlipClass puts #HigherEd students at the center of learning to promote better results.
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Survey respondents sound off on pros and cons of flipping

“The lines have become blurred and people talk about flipped classroom in ways it was never originally designed. The technology-enhanced, non-rigorous flipped classroom should not be confused with research-based active learning pedagogies.”
– Associate professor at a four-year public institution

“It’s very dependent on how well students can be motivated to do the work outside class. When they’re not willing, it’s worse than traditional methods.”
– Instructor at a public, four-year Canadian research-intensive university

“Students in my face-to-face classes thrive on an active learning environment in which they are engaged in a variety of activities.”
– Adjunct professor at a two-year institution

“There is more work involved. It takes more preparation and more emotional energy to be this involved with students.”
– Instructor from a public, four-year institution

  

See More: Blended Learning Videos

 

Facebook announced details on its virtual reality future, with Mark Zuckerberg (CEO) confirming that the Oculus Rift release date will be some time in early 2016. Market analysts offered varied reactions to how Zuckerberg described the expected—gradual—growth of the VR headset.

“This is going to grow slowly, like computers and mobile phones when they first arrived,”  Zuckerberg said during the Facebook’s 3rd quarter earnings call with analysts. He drew a comparison to the fact that, after smartphones entered the market in 2003, sales at first were in the hundreds of thousands.

Some analysts took that to mean that Facebook is in fact predicting Oculus sales in that range for 2016. “We believe FB management may have quelled investor fears of an expense growth surprise in CY16 given commentary that Oculus’s virtual reality platform could take time to develop and might just sell hundreds of thousands of units in its first year,” Goldman Sachs wrote.

Credit Suisse, meanwhile, wrote that Oculus is expected to contribute about $2.1 billion in revenue for 2016. “We continue to assume that Facebook will follow a razor/razorblades model and sell the Oculus hardware at a loss to drive adoption,” the firm wrote.

Zuckerberg also discussed the way that Virtual Reality VR could be applied to areas other than entertainment, such as social behavior and communication. “That’s where Facebook has the DNA to build the best experiences,” he said. Those other areas, Zuckerberg said, are “a lot of what we’re extremely excited about for a number of years down the road.”

It should be remembered that Facebook has already been on Social Experiments to manipulate users emotions (See: Facebook Tinkers With Users’ Emotions in News Feed Experiment, Stirring Outcry)

See My Videos of Us Playing With Oculus Rift in 2013:

Also: Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift VR

Original Article- Source: http://chicagoinno.streetwise.co/2015/11/05/oculus-rift-release-date-facebook-virtual-reality-2016-plans/

VR = Virtual Reality
IoT = Internet of Things

From medicine to science and engineering, VR and related technologies could soon change teaching and learning.

Virtual Reality and the IoT Can Fuel a Connected, Gesture-Driven Classroom
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I think Mr. Walter’s November 2nd article in EdTech HigherEd,  is forward thinking in his recent observation about the the increased use of Virtual Reality in Higher Education and it’s connection to the Internet of Things— a natural progression for research universities in all subject domains (and most definitely not going to be found in an under-classman’s large lecture hall).

One aspect of the article I don’t believe can be emphasized enough is Google’s involvement. He writes:

“Google is accelerating the march forward toward a more gesture-fueled Internet of Things. The company unveiled projects this year that incorporate not only virtual reality, but also a technology called augmented reality: a view of the real-world environment that is supplemented by computer-generated sounds, video and graphics.

Google’s major movement into the space, Project Tango, allows tablets, robots and other devices to use spatial and dimensional understanding of their environments. For example, one could use a tablet to scan a room and create a 3D map of the space, which could then be used by an architect or designer for space planning.”

From medicine to science and engineering, VR and related technologies could soon change teaching and learning.
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See a Previous Post on the Internet of Things (iot)

Original Source article: http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2015/11/virtual-reality-iot-connected-gesture-classroom
by Derek Walter